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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE             MEDIA CONTACT:  Matthew Lindsay

June 2, 2003                                                     (202) 994-1423; mlindsay@gwu.edu

 

GW’S DIMOCK GALLERY PRESENTS “FINALE,”

THE LAST IN A SERIES OF MFA THESIS SHOWS

JUNE 4-13

 

EVENT:          An exhibition of selected thesis work from three Master of Fine Arts (MFA) candidates, Ira-Azka Fairuza Nasution, Rachel Quirk and Carl Williams, presented by The George Washington University Dimock Gallery.

 

WHEN:           Exhibition Dates:  June 4 – 13, 2003

                        Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.;

                                               Friday 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

 

WHERE:        The George Washington University

                        Dimock Gallery, Lisner Auditorium – Lower Level

                        730 21st Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

(Foggy Bottom-GWU Metro, Blue and Orange lines)

 

BACKGROUND:

 

“Finale,” the fourth and final MFA Thesis exhibition features product design by Ira Nasution, computer-generated design by Rachel Quirk and graphic design by Carl Williams.

 

Ira Nasution is promoting “Sumatra Frappuccino,” a new coffee brand, through innovative product design.  Through visual communication design, her tasteful and exotic images reflect the style of South East Asian (Indonesian) art and culture.

 

Rachel Quirk uses brilliant and intense colors in her 14 computer-generated ink-jet prints.  She creates a textural effect that is characteristic of her abstract work.  Although created on a computer, the images exude a painterly quality.

 

Carl Williams observes a world that revolves around corporate identity and chose to take a different approach to brand identity: Creating Brand Identity Through an Integrated Approach for a Children’s Product shows the level of diversity of designers. Williams’ research examined the relationship between graphic design and marketing while developing a brand strategy for the introduction of a new toy. His playful simian character may resemble Pokémon, but the problem is to target an audience that may range from 3-year-old sons to 83-year-old grandmothers. It is up to the designer and the marketing team to determine the best approach to reaching the targeted age group.

 

For more news about GW, visit the GW News Center at www.gwnewscenter.org.

 

-GW-

 

 

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