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LOS ANGELES—I attended the opening dinner of New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner's campaign for the Senate and he is starting off with the good wishes of a great many very fine people.

I had a glimpse of Mrs. David Levy at this dinner and it was a real joy, for I had missed seeing her the past few months.

Of course, Senator Herbert Lehman introduced Mayor Wagner as his successor. Hard as it is to follow in Senator Lehman's footsteps, it will be an inspiration to Bob Wagner to have both his father's record and Senator Lehman's to live up to. I think this will strengthen him very much.

He really wants the Senatorship because of his father's long service in the Senate, and I have a feeling that he will make a good campaign.

Difficult as it is to overcome the feeling of many people his opponent, Attorney General Jacob K. Javits, is a liberal, I think it should be remembered that no matter what his personal inclination is, if a candidate is a member of the Republican party, he must follow the Republican policies. These perhaps will not always coincide with Javits' liberal tendencies, but he will have to subjugate his own point of view because the discipline of the Republican party is stern.

I lunched on Tuesday with Dr. Ralph Bunche and some other people to consider the question of paintings made of famous Negroes in this country. This is a wonderful collection and what should be done with it is a matter for careful consideration.

In the afternoon I attended the tea and reception of the Business and Professional Women's Club of Greater New York at Gracie Mansion, where the presentation of awards was made to women of achievement.

My friend, Mrs. Dorothy Lewis, was one of the recipients and this gave me great satisfaction. Later I spoke at the dressmakers' union at a political rally and around 11:30 p.m. I boarded a plane for Chicago where I changed for Portland, Ore.

This is a campaign trip and I am looking forward to it with interest.

Talking of campaigning, earlier this month a book was published by Houghton Mifflin Company called "The Lady and the Vote," by Marion K. Sanders.

It is a most amusing account of personal experiences in politics by a young woman who ran in what, for a Democrat, is a hopeless district in New York State. She still looks at her experiences objectively and writes about them in an instructive and entertaining way.

I like the fact that she paid a tribute to the husbands of women who go into politics, a tribute which I have always thought they deserved, for they often cheerfully pay the bills and give up their home comfort.

I am sure any of you who read "The Lady and the Vote" will enjoy it, no matter to what political party you belong.

E.R.

(Copyright, 1956, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)


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  • Los Angeles (Calif., United States)


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, September 29, 1956

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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