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HYDE PARK, Monday—During this Presidential campaign I have been thinking about some of the promises that were made in previous campaigns, which circumstances later made it difficult to carry out. I remember well my husband's conviction—similar to those held by some candidates today—that he was going to be able to curtail expenditures and balance the budget, but circumstances forced him to do exactly the opposite.

One of the arguments that he made in his campaign was that we needed a change, that the problems facing the nation required that change. So, the people decided in 1932 that in this first instance it was true.

There's no doubt that the people felt that the party in power had had opportunities over a long period to remedy the troubles facing the nation. In spite of years of great prosperity we were plunged into years that saw long lines of men waiting for a cup of coffee and a piece of bread outside such places as were providing this as a charity. We also remember able-bodied men selling apples on street corners. We were being stopped many times and asked for food in the streets of our hometowns.

Any experiment was preferable to what was happening to many people. In later elections, with just as serious situations but of a different type before us, the people decided not to make a change.

Today we are again facing serious situations and it is again up to the people to decide whether the promise of reduced taxation and a balanced budget is a valid promise since so many circumstances may force changes.

The second thing we must decide is whether the conditions under the Democratic party have been so bad that it does require a party change and which of the two candidates is best able to meet the situations that may face us in the next four years.

Instead of serious depression we are in a period of inflation, with high costs, high earnings and high wages. This must, of course, be changed, but it is a question of how it shall be done. Most of the social advances have come under the Democratic party.

Of the two candidates, it seems to me that Governor Stevenson will do what needs to be done in the wisest way and, being a representative of the Democratic party, he will not go back on the social advances made and he will try to move forward in the interests of all the people.

The other day I read one of the short Paul Gallico series, called "The Small Miracle." It has the charm all of his stories seem to have, and I don't think anyone could read it without a sigh for Pepino and Violetta, but at the same time a smile of tenderness for such love and faith.

E. R.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT, 1952, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.; REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART PROHIBITED.)


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  • Hyde Park (Dutchess County, N.Y., United States) [ index ]


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, October 14, 1952

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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