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NEW YORK, Friday—I am very much interested in the answers given in Abilene the other day when General Eisenhower was questioned by reporters on international and domestic matters.

On FEPC he said that "fairness and equality" should be pursued by the Federal government. As a generality I think that is fine, but as an answer to the question of whether he believes in an FEPC law it falls a little short of clarity.

On the steel question also he seems to have stated something that is entirely true, namely, "since the Supreme Court has now ruled against the seizure by the President that ruling should stand." It does not, however, answer the question of what should happen now. General Eisenhower must be concerned to get the wheels rolling as soon as possible, for he, above most people, must recognize what will happen in Korea and in Europe even if we have a few days' shutdown in steel production.

When the general says that "peace and security in the world" is the paramount issue today everyone will agree with him.

It is certainly an unenviable position to be a candidate because whatever you say is wrong to some people. If you would rather not decide where you stand on anything at the present time, many will think that you are just playing a cagey game and that you have made up your mind it would be better to express no opinions so that you will make fewer enemies. Whereas if you state your views openly you lay yourself open to the attack of anyone who disagrees with you.

There was a heading put on a newspaper article recently about me which is totally misleading and which will give the Soviets great satisfaction. It read: "Mrs. Roosevelt Backs 'A' Bomb as Humane."

Of course, I did nothing of the kind; that is what the Russians say I did.

I explained only that Mr. Hugh Baillie of the United Press, whom the Soviets have been attacking regularly in their press, since he sent a dispatch from Las Vegas, Nevada, after witnessing one of the last atomic tests, was in fact reflecting the military point of view that the use of this type of atom bomb might be considered more humane because it could be concentrated and used so precisely that it would wipe out enemy troops instead of touching enemy civilian areas.

I hope sincerely the atom bomb will never have to be used by any nation again. I am glad that those nations that are most advanced in the development of the atom bomb will hold it as a weapon to prevent war and not to make war. It is safer in their hands as a preventive, and I hope that no one will know very precisely how much the more advanced nations do know about its use, for the more they keep people guessing the more everyone will fear what it might do.

It seems to me that too many headline writers do not take the trouble to read through a story. It is disappointing to have them write the kind of headline that will give aid and comfort to the Communists.

E. R.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT, 1952, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART PROHIBITED.)


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About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, June 7, 1952

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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