Print ColumnText Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

PARIS, Thursday—As we sat and waited for the opening session of the United Nations meetings here to get under way, one of the news service correspondents came over and asked the inevitable question which, of course, cannot be answered.

I turned it over to Ambassador Warren Austin to handle.

"Do you think," said the newspaperman "this session of the U.N. will bring us peace?"

I could not help saying that this was a foolish question because no one session, nor any one action, could bring peace to the world.

Peace would be continuously fought for, and turning to Ambassador Austin I asked him what his feeling was. He said it would take many generations before we could have peace, but if we succeeded in strengthening this organization which we have begun to build it might well serve to bring us peace.

We seem to be lucky over here, for our weather is comparatively mild. According to reports from the United States winter seems to have come to many parts of our country.

The elections that were held at home on Tuesday did not bring the same excitement here as did our Presidential election in 1948. I cannot help but be interested in some of the local results at home and hope we will get a more or less full account in one of the Paris editions of our New York newspapers.

Many of my labor friends at home must be rejoicing over the fact that Leon Jouhaux, one of the strongest of the older French anti-Communist labor leaders, has been awarded the 1951 Nobel Peace Prize. He is the seventh citizen of France to get this honor, and his friends will be happy for him. Mr. Jouhaux is held in high esteem by labor groups in many countries, including our own.

President Vincent Auriol of France delivered his welcome address to the U.N. delegates well and impressively. He said he hoped the leaders who are gathered here, the most important of men, will meet together and try to find ways of composing the world's difficulties. His theme was the need to find the world peace.

Retiring President Narrollah Entezam in his parting speech, said he was being an optimist as he has faith in the United Nations organization. He believed that the clouds hanging over us last year threatened war more seriously than they do this year, and he felt advances had really been made which strengthened the organization.

Before the session adjourned the former Secretary of Foreign affairs for Mexico, Dr. Padilla Nervo, was elected President of the Assembly. It would have been natural to have a Western European preside over these Paris meetings but they had no candidate, whereas the Latin Americans had several. When it came to a vote Mexico's Dr. Nervo won by a large majority, which should be a satisfaction to the whole Latin American group.

E. R.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT, 1951, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART PROHIBITED.)


Names Mentioned or Referenced

Geographic

  • Paris (France)


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, November 9, 1951

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
[ ERPP bio | LC | VIAF | WorldCat | DPLA | Wikidata | SNAC ]

Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]
  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
    [ ISNI ]
  • Black, Allida M. (Editor)
    [ VIAF | ISNI ]
  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]
  • Alhambra, Christopher C. (Electronic Text Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]

Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project

Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
TMs, AERP, FDRL