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NEW YORK, Tuesday—Here is the prayer that was said on United Nations Day here in New York City, but I hope you will not forget it in the other days throughout the year.

"God of the measureless Universe...Creator of man's conscience... to Thee in this our fervent prayer for peace, we lift our voices in unison.

"We...Americans of every faith...of every creed...join together... pleading for truth, justice and charity among men. We pray for Thy omnipotent aid in this hour of imperiled civilization.

"That Thou shall cast out forever from human thought that flaming intolerance which makes for war and breeds bloody aggression.

"That the advocates of war shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks.

"We pray to Thee for the restoration of concord and amity among all the peoples of the earth.

"That all persons recognize the liberty due religion, and for the renewal of the way of life that is fruitful of great and good works.

"This, O Lord, is our fervent prayer, and this is our mingled tribute to Thy everlasting mercy."

Saying this prayer may be one way of reminding us that we, in the democracies, have a fight to wage—a fight to wage for peace.

There are many ways in which we can do this. One is by being prepared in a military way. This we do in the hope that whoever is thinking of attacking us will think twice and decide it is not worth the price.

A second way is to try to use our resources in conjunction with the other nations of the world to help them develop their resources and thereby raise the standard of living and make life more worth living. People who are happy and well fed are much less willing to fight a war.

A third way is to live our lives as nearly as possible on the pattern set down for us by Christ so many years ago. This effort will remove many causes of war, and it is toward strengthening our will to do this that I think this prayer may be useful.

I hate to see the way we are going to be obliged to turn our minds to self-preservation in case of atomic warfare. However, those precautions must be taken since we live in a world in which the secrets of the atom are known and can be used either to make life better or to destroy it completely.

I have just received advance copies of a book which will be published on October 27, and will be available in two different editions. It is called, "How to Survive an Atomic Bomb," and is edited by the Combat Forces and Press and the Rinehart Company. I am sure it will hold your attention.

E.R.

(WORLD COPYRIGHT, 1950, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART PROHIBITED)


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About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, October 25, 1950

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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