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NEW YORK, Thursday—The world as a whole looks brighter today because of the foreign news. It is encouraging to be going off to the meeting in London, feeling that the three Foreign Ministers who have been meeting in Moscow, have found satisfactory settlements of controversial issues and have parted with warm and friendly words.

I have always found that personal relationships, however small and unimportant they may seem, have a bearing on the success of the settlement of bigger questions.

I am also very happy that President Truman is said to be going to talk to the nation right after the New Year. I think the people always appreciate the President's speaking directly to them on the issues that face the nation. If the people understand what the President wants to have done, they will make every effort to come up to any height which may make his leadership easier and stronger.

In our own domestic situation I feel we are still somewhat at sea, because various groups among us do not understand the full implications at home and abroad of any steps that we take in this country. I hope the President can make clear to us that everything we do at the present time is bound to bring hope or despair to the peoples of the world.

* * *

Yesterday afternoon I opened the door and found the weather suddenly like spring. Driving down this morning the snow seemed to have melted away and brown fields lay bare before our eyes where snow covered the landscape last Monday.

Before I left home, I took Fala out, but walking on the ice was precarious. Fala would slip and I would slip. He would bounce off into the snow, breaking the crust, and then have to take a tremendous jump to get out again.

Both of us felt that we would like to stay in the country with the blue sky overhead and the wonderful clean, exhilarating air. Fala rolled himself in the snow, and I am sure the crust scratched his back and then he would poke his nose down trying to tell what little animals had scurried around before him. There isn't any question about it, the country is the place for man and beast to live permanently. But back we had to trek for there isn't much time remaining before I leave on Sunday.

It is somewhat ironical that we are going over by ship, because no matter how wonderful a ship the Queen Elizabeth may be, I have never been overly fond of a trip on the ocean. Nor does the month of January add to the sea's charm for me.

I see myself walking miles around the deck in stormy weather, trying to absorb whatever information they wish to impart to us during the trip, in spite of my heavy head. I am never seasick any more, at least I haven't been for some time, but neither do I feel particularly happy. Perhaps I shall be able to fly home, however, and that will be a great advantage since I surely will be wanting to get home quickly.

E.R.

(COPYRIGHT 1945 BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.)


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About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, December 29, 1945

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
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  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
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  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
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Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
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Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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