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NEW YORK, Thursday—A very great sadness came to all of us who write for the United Feature Syndicate when we heard yesterday morning of George Carlin's death. It seemed almost impossible to believe. The last time I saw him he seemed so vital and alive, full of interest in his recent trip abroad and in the results which he hoped to achieve now that he was home again. For his wife and family this is a terrible personal loss. For those of us who worked with him, and I am sure others feel as I do, it means the loss of a friend and wise counsellor. He had vision and imagination, and he was still so young that most of us who worked for him counted on the good he would be able to do for many years to come. As general manager, he held a position which could and did have great influence on the thinking of the people throughout the nation, and the loss to the country is a real loss.

* * *

On Tuesday night, with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., her daughter and Miss Thompson, I went to see "State of the Union." In this play, Howard Lindsay and Russell Crouse have managed to treat a serious political subject in an amusing and light vein. All of us laughed, but I hope, when we went home, we thought about some of the serious aspects of what we had seen and heard. It was so natural that I could close my eyes and think I heard certain individuals talking. No one character is a counterpart of any particular individual; but the situations and phrases have been so carefully picked out and woven together that at some time one remembers hearing and seeing almost exactly what is acted on the stage. We need many more women like the play's Mary Matthews.

* * *

After seeing a number of people in the office yesterday, I attended a very pleasant tea at the Ladies Home Journal office, given for one of their London correspondents, Miss Dorothy Black. It provided an opportunity for gathering in many members of the staff. Strange to say, writers and illustrators in many cases had never met, though they had corresponded for many years! If the others enjoyed as much as I did this chance to meet those whose names they had read in print for a long time, I am sure the party was one of the most successful ever given by Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Gould, coeditors of the magazine.

When I left, my troubles began! No taxis were to be had, and we dashed through the streets with wind and rain impeding our progress. Finally I got a bus on Fifth Avenue to take me downtown. After a rather hurried supper, I reached the Women's Trade Union League clubhouse before 7 p.m. for my class there. A very kindly lady took me in her automobile to Greenwich House, where from 8:30 to 10 p.m. the trade unions of today were discussed.

E. R.

(COPYRIGHT 1945 BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.)


Names Mentioned or Referenced

Persons

Organizations

  • Ladies' Home Journal
  • United Feature Syndicate.
         [ LC ]
  • Women's Trade Union League
         [ LC ]

Geographic

  • New York (N.Y., United States)


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, November 30, 1945

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
[ ERPP bio | LC | VIAF | WorldCat | DPLA | Wikidata | SNAC ]

Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]
  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
    [ ISNI ]
  • Black, Allida M. (Editor)
    [ VIAF | ISNI ]
  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]
  • Alhambra, Christopher C. (Electronic Text Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]

Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project

Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
TMs, AERP, FDRL