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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Friday morning I came up here, and at noon I went to one of the battalions of the military police school to talk about what training I had seen going on in the Southwest Pacific. In the late afternoon, I went to Vassar College to speak to the members of the Political Association. It was interesting to have dinner with them because Vassar is now being run on a cooperative basis, and a great part of the work is being done by the girls themselves.

Late yesterday aftenoon, two men from Washington came up to see me to discuss some activities going on outside the Government, which may be helpful in the whole food situation.

I have heard that many people worry that we, in this country, may actually reach a point where we shall be short of necessary food. While I do not think that this is likely to happen, there are many angles to this situation which I wish more of us knew something about, for food is a real weapon both for war and for peace. The way in which we organize for full protection in this country, where we have such great advantages in mechanical equipment, may be a factor in the establishment of peace in the future, as well as a great factor in keeping a stable situation at home in the days immediately following the war.

The farmers of our nation have a great responsibility to understand the world problems. By farmers I do not mean only those who own great tracts of land and run a big business type of farm. I mean the men and women who look upon farming as a way of life, who are content to live on their farms and to make a good living and to educate their children. They are concerned with education, health and agricultural problems throughout the world, because, in the whole world, just as here at home, that way of life is basic and the foundation on which everything else in the nation must rest.

On Monday the 25th of this month, the National Women's Council of the Navy League of the United States will open an exhibition called "WAVES At War," which will run for two weeks. It will be at the International Building, Rockefeller Center, New York City. Two phases of WAVES' work will be stressed.

In one, ten WAVES and a male pharmacist's mate are actually at work, showing the operating room, dentistry, x-ray, and the use of blood plasma. Another part of the work is shown depicting blind flying and radio direction. This exhibition should be interesting to many girls and their families who may be considering the kind of work they would like to do to aid in the war effort.

I hope that many people will attend this exhibition. Even if they do not go into the Waves, it will give them a better understanding of the way in which girls in this service are supplementing the work of the men and are freeing many who want to serve overseas.

E.R.

(COPYRIGHT, 1943, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.)


Names Mentioned or Referenced

Geographic

  • Hyde Park (Dutchess County, N.Y., United States) [ index ]


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, October 25, 1943

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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