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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—Nearing Washington, yesterday, was just like any other flight from some point in our country. The plane we were in looked a little different and our companions were not the usual ones who fill a plane on an everyday trip. Outside of the crew, every boy on board was a returning member of a crew which had delivered a war plane to a country overseas. Talking with them was both interesting and entertaining.

We had flown over the water and the journey had covered a good many hours, so Miss Thompson and I meant what we said when we thanked our pilot and the crew for an exceptionally comfortable trip. I was surprised to see the Secret Service standing around the cars, which I knew meant the President was there to meet us. In a way I feel as though I had not been gone at all, and in another way it seems as though I had been gone for ages.

Work here starts just where it left off, and so far as I can tell, we shall be busy in much the same way as if we had not gone at all. There is one little addition, however, namely a number of people think it would be nice if I could just manage to attend a meeting for a few minutes to tell them all about Great Britain.

I wish I could, for I would like to tell every person in the entire country, but I am afraid I shall have to trust to doing some radio broadcasts and keeping such engagements as I have already made. For the coming week, I have had to cancel certain engagements because of various visitors and obligations which have come up in the White House while I was gone. After that, I hope not to have to disappoint any people to whom I have already promised appointments.

A number of people came to see me yesterday and there is still a great thrill in sharing recent impressions with really interested friends. I lunched with my husband in his office, which is something I only do on particular occasions. I called my daughter in Seattle, Wash. last night, which is another pleasure I very rarely allow myself. Tonight I hope to speak to Elliott's wife, Ruth, who must be most anxious to get news of her husband.

The President and I dined alone, and I went to listen to him make his broadcast for the Herald-Tribune Forum. I was sorry not to be able this year to be on the program, but it seemed impossible to know beforehand when I would be back in this country. As it turned out, it was fortunate I made no plans, for I could not possibly have reached New York City in time.

This morning I had a very large press conference. I am gradually getting through the mail and the business which must be done before I am ready to start with a clean slate again.

E.R.

(COPYRIGHT, 1942, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.)


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About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, November 19, 1942

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
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  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
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  • Black, Allida M. (Editor)
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  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
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  • Alhambra, Christopher C. (Electronic Text Editor)
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Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
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Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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