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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Friday night, the President returned to Washington. On Saturday morning, our Norwegian guests left on their drive to Massachusetts, where they will be on the shore for the rest of the summer. I think they were all looking forward to the free and peaceful life up there.

I had my annual picnic yesterday for the Hudson Shore Labor School. The old Summer School for Industrial Workers at Bryn Mawr now has transferred its habitat to Miss Hilda Smith's place across the river from us. Some sixty girls from every part of the country and from a variety of unions are studying there this summer. They have a few Austrian refugees and two campers from Canada.

I enjoyed my time with them very much indeed. I think my greatest pleasure was in meeting Dr. Max Lerner for the first time. We sat around and talked after lunch and I noticed how stimulating he was. But he did not come up to speak to me until just before they all left, when he brought his daughters over to introduce them and it was a pleasant surprise to discover his identity.

Today a few friends are coming to lunch and Bishop Atwood, who is staying with my sister-in-law, Mrs. J. R. Roosevelt, is coming over with her this afternoon to see me.

The news is discouraging to read these days. I keep wondering if a day will ever come when we shall open a newspaper or turn on a radio without a sinking of the heart.

I am receiving the most interesting items of information as to the work which is being done in various communities near our Army camps. In Falmouth, Mass., a group of 600 girls, which they hope will soon grow to 800, has been organized to attend dances in the camps. One chaperon is in charge of every six or seven girls, and I understand it has proven to be a very satisfactory and pleasant way to be of service.

In the Galveston, Texas, area, the restaurant owners in the city were called together and asked to provide a special dinner not to exceed 25 cents for men in uniform. The plate would be called a "soldiers special" or something similar. I think this is a grand idea and shows that there is organization going on really to be of service to the men in uniform.

E.R.

(COPYRIGHT, 1941, BY UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.)


Names Mentioned or Referenced

Geographic

  • Hyde Park (Dutchess County, N.Y., United States) [ index ]


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, July 7, 1941

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
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Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

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MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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