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NEW YORK, Thursday—We spent a quiet afternoon and evening yesterday, except for a short time in the afternoon when we were visited by a young family whose small son, now aged two, I had not seen since he was about two months old. There is no doubt about it, you cannot have a very peaceful, quite time with a healthy, romping youngster of that age. He kept us all on the alert every minute, though only his mother and father did the actual chasing around.

These young people have had a pretty hard struggle, but they must be very proud of their achievement, for they have a fine little boy and are gradually winning through to independence and security.

I must give you part of a letter which came to me a short time ago. As a prescription for any woman who happens to be feeling a little low in spirits, I think it would be hard to equal.

She writes: "Once I heard a public speaker say when you found yourself in the dumps, you would topsy-turvy, go buy yourself a red hat ... Remembering that admonition, I drove into town from our small ... farm and invested hard earned butter, cream and egg money in a new, almost red, hat, adding a topper to match the hat as well as my extravagance ... Then I filled 'Regina' (the old 1934 car) with gas and, amid protests from family and friends, in a steady downpour of rain, I headed for..."

What she did then was to go in search of adventure and she found it, had her fill, and returned to her everyday tasks. This is the way she expresses her satisfaction. "Though I have been a teetotaller all my life, and still am, I now know how one feels when something makes the whole world look rosy, for mine suddenly took on the shade of that new red hat and coat. Even 'Regina' purred like a new car all the way home, despite my husband's warning that she should never be driven outside the city limits of her own hometown. Home for a week, but the memory of the exciting experience still lingers and makes the round of setting my house in order, packing the eggs for market, moulding the butter, feeding the baby chicks, much more interesting."

Here is a lesson for all of us. If you are alone in the world, every now and then take time off and go for a little adventure. If there are two of you, do it together now and again. You have no idea what those little adventures will mean in the color and warmth of your life. It is always better to share things if you can, of course, with husband, wife or friend. It seems to prolong the enjoyment.

We are starting off on a little adventure of our own this morning out in the Connecticut countryside and will drive our own car to find a house we have never seen before. They assure us that the dogwood is beautiful and, with the air and sunshine as they are today, I am sure everything will be at its most entrancing.

Tomorrow I will tell you how our particular adventure has fared.

E.R.

(Copyright, 1938, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.)


Names Mentioned or Referenced

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  • New York (N.Y., United States)


About this document

My Day. by Eleanor Roosevelt, May 6, 1938

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
[ ERPP bio | LC | VIAF | WorldCat | DPLA | Wikidata | SNAC ]

Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
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  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
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  • Black, Allida M. (Editor)
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  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
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  • Alhambra, Christopher C. (Electronic Text Editor)
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Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
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Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a UFS wire copy of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
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