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NEW HAVEN, Conn., Thursday—I am constantly struck by the keen interest which my mother in law takes in anything which has to do with old family traditions. She had brought down to the dining room yesterday, the old wooden cradle to show us during lunch. Her grandfather had it made in 1807 for his first child and my mother in law told us that she believed the only member of our generation who had ever slept in it was the President. She explained that she had had sufficient sentiment about it to pull the cradle out of the attic on one of her visits when her baby Franklin was six months old, but she did not put his head under the hood for he was so active she was afraid he would sit up and hurt himself! So he slept instead with his head where other baby's feet had been.

We left a few minutes late but the crowds at the various places where we stopped made us increasingly late and we arrived in Boston more than an hour after the time scheduled. I have never seen a crowd like the one on Boston Common, it looked like a sea of faces extending in every direction. In spite of the long wait, it was a friendly good humored crowd. We made two more stops before reaching Worcester and the number of people in these smaller places seemed even more extraordinary considering their population.

By the time we reached the train again we were an hour and twenty minutes behind schedule and every one scurried around to get cleaned up and ready for the evening meeting.

James and Betsey and Johnnie were with us all day but James and Johnnie left us about eleven p.m., Betsey is staying with us so as to see her father and mother today before she goes back to join James.

This morning was gray but not raining and we started out with the top of the car down. Luckily as the day went on the sun came out until now it is really quite a pleasant warm day.

Hartford, being a Democratic City gave the President a very warm welcome and all along the line they continued to be as hospitable as they were yesterday. The Hartford schools were closed to allow the children to see the President and so I think were schools all along the line for children in great numbers were in the crowds, but today people have seemed on the whole to remember not to surge forward and I have not had the feeling of dread that I had yesterday that some one might be hurt.

We have just reached Dr. Harvey Cushing's for lunch, an hour behind schedule so what will happen the rest of the day I do not know but the President expects to reach Washington tonight and Mrs. Scheider and I expect to get off the train in New York City.

E.R.


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Geographic

  • New Haven (Conn., United States)


About this document

My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, October 23, 1936

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962
[ ERPP bio | LC | VIAF | WorldCat | DPLA | Wikidata | SNAC ]

Digital edition created by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project The George Washington University Old Main Building, Suite 406 1951 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

  • Brick, Christopher (Editor)
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  • Regenhardt, Christy (Associate Editor)
    [ ISNI | ORCID ]
  • Black, Allida M. (Editor)
    [ VIAF | ISNI ]
  • Binker, Mary Jo (Associate Editor)
    [ VIAF | ORCID ]
  • Alhambra, Christopher C. (Electronic Text Editor)
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Digital edition published 2008, 2017 by
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Available under licence from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Published with permission from the Estate of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

MEP edition publlished on 2008-06-30

TEI-P5 edition published on 2017-04-28

Transcription created from a photocopy of a draft version of a My Day column instance archived at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. My Day column draft dated October 22, 1936, FDR Library, Hyde Park, NY
TMsd, 22 October 1936, AERP, FDRL