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Events Archive - 2007

Audio recordings of selected events are available here.

Fall 2007

Winners and Losers: ROK Election 2007 Update

Presented by: The Korea Economic Institute.

Friday, December 21, 2007
9:00-10:30 a.m.
KEI Conference Center
1201 F Street NW, Suite 910
Washington, D.C.

Evans Revere, President and CEO of The Korea Society

Lee Hawon, Washington Correspondent, Chosun Ilbo

Kirk Larsen, Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History and International Affairs and Director of the Sigur Center and Asian Studies Program, The George Washington University

Join KEI President Jack Pritchard as he moderates a discussion with three leading Korea experts on the results of the December 19th presidential election in South Korea, the impact on the U.S.-ROK Alliance, inter-Korean negotiations, and nuclear negotiations with North Korea. Light refreshments will be served.

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Can Democracy Survive Globalization? Lessons From Taiwan

Presented by:The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Taiwan Foundation for Democracy, The Future of Democracy Initiative, and The Formosa Foundation.

Monday, December 17, 2007
9:00 am - 4:15 pm
Jack Morton Auditorium
The George Washington University
805 21st St., NW

Read a transcript of this event. P D F icon (from the Formosa Foundation)

Schedule:

9:00-10:00 am - Opening Session

  • Welcome: Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The George Washington University; Terri Giles, Director, Formosa Foundation; Wen-cheng Lin, President, Taiwan Foundation for Democracy
  • "Global Forces and the Challenges to Democracy," David Huang, Deputy Representative, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office, Washington, DC
  • "UN Membership for Taiwan in the New Era of Democracy and Globalization," Lung-chu Chen, Chairman, Taiwan New Century Foundation & President, UN For Taiwan Alliance

10:00-11:30 am - Globalization and Impact on Taiwan's Democracy
Chair: Edward McCord, Associate Professor of History & International Affairs, The George Washington University

  • "Power and Democracy in Post-Confucian Globalized Societies," David Steinberg, Distinguished Professor of Asian Studies, Georgetown University
  • "Economic Growth and Democratic Practices," Tun-jen Cheng, Class of 1935 Professor, Department of Government, College of William & Mary
  • "The Third Wave of Authoritarianism and China," Edward Friedman, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin
  • "Democracy and Legitimacy: The False Promise of Globalization," Donald Rodgers, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Austin College

11:45 a.m. - 12:15 pm - Remarks on Current State of Democracy
Chair: Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The George Washington University

  • Wen-cheng Lin, Taiwan Foundation for Democracy
  • Carl Gershman, President, National Endowment for Democracy

12:15-12:30 pm - Plenary Address

  • Ambassador James Lilley, former U.S. Ambassador to the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Korea and former Director of the American Institute in Taiwan

12:30-1:00 pm - Keynote Address

  • Senator Bob Dole, former U.S. Senate Majority Leader

1:00-2:00 pm - Lunch (805 21st Street, 2F)

2:00-3:30 pm - Democracy and Security in Cross-Strait Stability
Chair: Bruce Dickson, Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, The George Washington University

  • "East Asian Democracies and Regional Peace," Stephen Yates, President, DC Asia Advisory
  • "China's Illiberalism and Regional Stability," June Teufel Dreyer, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Miami
  • "U.S. Balancing Act in Cross-Strait Relations," John Tkacik, Jr., Senior Research Fellow, The Heritage Foundation
  • "U.S. Ideas on China's Future," James Mann, FPI Author in Residence, The Johns Hopkins University

3:30-4:15 pm – Taiwan Policy Road Map for the Next U.S. President
Chair: Henry R. Nau, Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, The George Washington University

  • Randall Schriver, Founding Partner, Armitage International, LLC; Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asia
  • Rupert Hammond-Chambers, President, U.S.-Taiwan Business Council
  • Christopher Griffin, Research Fellow, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research

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Roundtable: Taiwan's Upcoming Elections

Presented by: The Sigur Center's Taiwan Education and Research Program.

Part of the Democracy and Security Seminar Series, offered in partnership with and with the support of The Taiwan Foundation for Democracy

Tuesday, December 11, 2007
2:00 - 5:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Featuring: A visiting Taiwan delegation sponsored by The Cross-Strait Interflow Prospects Foundation

Session One, 2:00-3:00 pm – Taiwan's 2008 Legislative and Presidential Elections
Dr. Yu Ching-hsin, Director, Election Study Center, National Chengchi University

Session Two, 3:30-5:00 pm: – Impact of Taiwan's Elections on Cross-Strait and International Relations
Dr. Cheng Tuan-yao, Director of the Institute of International Relations, National Chengchi University

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Assessing Progress in Afghanistan

Presented by: The Security Policy Forum, in cooperation with the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Institute for Middle East Studies, and the Security Policy Studies Program.

Wednesday, December 5, 2007
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

"The Military Situation" – U.S. Army Lt. Gen. (ret.) David Barno, Commander, Combined Forces Command-Afghanistan (2003-05)

"The Political Situation" – Larry Goodson, General Dwight D. Eisenhower Chair of National Security, U.S. Army War College

"Provincial Reconstruction Teams" – Robert Perito, Senior Program Officer, Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations, United States Institute of Peace

"The Pakistan Connection" – Ambassador Karl F. Inderfurth, Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia (1997-2001), Professor of the Practice of International Affairs, The George Washington University

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Nation Building in South Korea: Koreans, Americans, and the Making of a Democracy

Presented by: The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars' North Korea International Documentation Project, The George Washington University's Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, December 4, 2007
4:30 - 6:00 pm
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
5th Floor Auditorium
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, D.C. 20004

Reception to follow.

Gregg A. Brazinsky, Assistant Professor of History and International Affairs at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, and author of Nation Building in South Korea: Koreans, Americans, and the Making of a Democracy.

William W. Stueck Jr., Distinguished Research Professor of History at the University of Georgia, and an authority on U.S. diplomatic history, particularly American-Asian relations. Dr. Stueck is the author and editor of many books, including Rethinking the Korean War: A New Diplomatic and Strategic History.

James Delaney, a career CIA officer and former CIA Station Chief in Seoul and Tokyo during the 1980s. Mr. Delaney is currently a consultant for the Institute for Defense Analysis.

The panelists will discuss Brazinsky's new book Nation Building in South Korea: Koreans, Americans, and the Making of a Democracy (The University of North Carolina Press, 2007), in which he explains why South Korea was one of the few postcolonial nations that achieved rapid economic development and democratization by the end of the twentieth century. He contends that a distinctive combination of American initiatives and Korean agency enabled South Korea's stunning transformation. Expanding the framework of traditional diplomatic history, Brazinsky examines not only state-to-state relations, but also the social and cultural interactions between Americans and South Koreans. He shows how Koreans adapted, resisted, and transformed American influence and promoted socioeconomic change that suited their own aspirations.

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Integrating Wealth & Power in China

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Tuesday, December 4, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Speaker: Bruce Dickson, Professor of Political Science & International Affairs, The George Washington University

Bruce Dickson is Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, where he has taught since 1993. For the 2006-07 academic year, he received a fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, working on a project titled "Turning Wealth into Power: The Evolving Political Influence of China's 'Red Capitalists.'" He is the author of Red Capitalists in China: The Party, Private Entrepreneurs, and Prospects for Political Change (2003) and Democratization in China and Taiwan: The Adaptability of Leninist Parties (1997) and has written numerous articles. He is a frequent commentator on political developments in China and Taiwan and on U.S.-China relations and has appeared on CNN, NPR, BBC, and VOA. Professor Dickson earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

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The Vanishing Village: Policy Implications for India in the Era of Globalization

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Wednesday, November 28, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Dipankar Gupta, Professor of Sociology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India

Dipankar Gupta is Professor of Sociology at the Center for the Study of Social Systems, Jawaharlal Nehru University, in New Delhi, India. Currently he is a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. He has served as Chairman at the Center for the Study of Social Systems, Director of the Academic Staff College, and Senior Advisor at KPMG, in the Business Ethics and Integrity Division. His major publications include Learning to Forget: The Anti-Memoirs of Modernity (Oxford University Press, 2005), Interrogating Caste (Penguin, 2000) and Rivalry and Brotherhood: Politics in the Life of Farmers in North India (Oxford University Press, 1997). He received his BA in English, Political Science, and Economics from Kanpur University, MA in Sociology from Delhi University and Ph.D. in Sociology from Jawaharlal Nehru University.

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U.S.-Taiwan Economic Relations & Prospects for a Free Trade Agreement Roundtable

Tuesday, November 27, 2007
12:30-2:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Francis Liang, Director, Economic Division, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office, Washington, DC

Philip Levy, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research

John Tkacik, Jr., Senior Research Fellow, The Heritage Foundation

Chair: Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies & Korea Foundation
Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, The George Washington University

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Challenges for Japan's Defense Policy

Presented by: The Sigur Center and Asia Policy Point

Wednesday, November 7, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Robert M. "Skipp" Orr, Chairman of the Board, Panasonic Foundation

Robert "Skipp" Orr is currently Chairman of the Board of the Panasonic Foundation and Vice Chair of the National Association of Japan-America Societies. From 2002 to March 2007 he was President of Boeing Japan. Prior to joining Boeing, Dr. Orr was based in Brussels, serving as the Vice President and Director of European Affairs for Motorola. He previously held various senior level posts with Motorola in Japan, including Vice President of Government Relations. In addition to the corporate world, Orr has also spent many years in academia and the U.S. government. From 1985-93 he was a professor of Political Science at Temple University, with two years off to run the Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies and the Stanford Center for Technology and Innovation at the Stanford Japan Center in Kyoto. His book, The Emergence of Japan's Foreign Aid Power , won the 1991 Ohira Prize for best book on the Asia Pacific. Dr. Orr holds an M.A. in Government from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Tokyo University.

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The 15th Annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities: Korean Architecture: Past and Present

Presented by:The George Washington University's Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies.

Saturday, November 3, 2007
9:00 am - 1:30 pm
Room 113
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

This is a rare opportunity to hear some of the world-class architects talk about traditional and contemporary Korean architecture and landscape architecture. A Korean lunch will be provided.


Nationalism & Internationalism in Korea & Northeast Asia

Presented by: The Sigur Center for Asian Studies and The Korea Foundation

Part of The Korea Foundation's Global Korea Speakers Forum

Tuesday, October 30, 2007
12:00 - 2:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Photo: Kim Yongdeok

Kim Yongdeok, President, Northeast Asian History Foundation, Korea

Kim Yongdeok is President of the Northeast Asian History Foundation in Seoul, Korea. Previously, he was the Dean of the Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University (2003-06); Director of the Institute for Japanese Studies at Seoul National (2005-06); and President of the Korean Historical Association (1999-2000). He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo, Japan and Nankai University, China, as well as a Researcher at St. Paul's University, Japan and Visiting Researcher at Hitotsubashi University , Japan . From 1980-86, Dr. Kim served as Professor in the Department of Asian History at Seoul National. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Discussants:

  • Kim Ho-ki, Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Social Science, Yonsei University
  • Park Tae-Gyun, Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University
  • Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies & Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, The George Washington University

Schedule:

  • 12:00-12:30 pm: Light Lunch
  • 12:30-2:00 pm: Lecture & Discussion
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Unearthing the Secrets of a Mass Migration to North Korea: The Forgotten Victims of East Asia's Cold War

Presented by: The Sigur Center for Asian Studies and Asia Policy Point

Thursday, October 25, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
1957 E Street, NW

Tessa Morris-Suzuki, Professor of Japanese History, The Australian National University

Tessa Morris-Suzuki is Professor of Japanese History and Convenor of the Division of Pacific and Asian History in the College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University. She also convenes the Asia Civic Rights Network, and co-edits its online journal AsiaRights. Her research has covered subjects including frontiers and migration in East Asia; the history of the indigenous Ainu people of Japan; representations of history in popular media; and the social history of technology in Japan. Her books include Re-inventing Japan: Time, Space, Nation (M. E. Sharpe, 1998), The Past Within Us: Media, Memory, History (Verso, 2005), and Exodus to North Korea: Shadows from Japan's Cold War (Rowman and Littlefield, 2007).

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Negotiating with North Korea: Lessons & Challenges

Presented by: The Security Policy Forum, The Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Security Policy Studies Program

Tuesday, October 23, 2007
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Harry Harding Auditorium, Suite 213
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Victor Cha, U.S. Deputy Head of Delegation to the Six Party Talks; Director for Asian Affairs, U.S. National Security Council (2004-2007); School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

James A. Kelley, Assistant U.S. Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs (2001-2005); President, EAP Associates

Joel Wit, Coordinator for the 1994 Agreed Framework, U.S. State Department (1995-2001); Visiting Fellow, U.S.-Korea Institute, SAIS, Johns Hopkins University

Moderator:
Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies & Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, The George Washington University

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Breaking More Naan with Delhi: The Next Stage in U.S.-India Relations

Presented by: The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The Brookings Institution, The National Interest, and The Elliott School of International Affairs

Wednesday, October 17, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Amb. Karl Inderfurth, John O. Rankin Professor of the Practice of International Affairs and Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The George Washington University

Karl F. Inderfurth served as Assistant Secretary for South Asian Affairs at the State Department from 1997-2001.

Bruce Riedel, Senior Fellow, Saban Center for Middle East Policy, The Brookings Institution

Bruce Riedel served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Near East and South Asian Affairs on the National Security Council from 1997-2002.

A Preview & Discussion of Their Forthcoming Article in The National Interest

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Implications for China in Hosting the 2008 Beijing Olympics

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Wednesday, October 3, 2007
12:15 - 1:30 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Xiaoping Li, Senior Producer, CCTV International, China Central Television

Xiaoping Li is a Senior Producer at CCTV International (CCTV 9, English Service), China Central Television, Beijing, China (January 2004-present). She is also a Research Associate at the Center for International Communications Studies, Tsinghua University (May 2000- present). Previously, she was a Visiting Fellow with the Center for Northeast Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution (2000- 2001), where she conducted research on significant changes in the Chinese TV system in recent decades and the role of Chinese TV in China's policy making. Ms. Li was also a Producer/Program Director for the International Division of the Current Affairs Department, China Central Television (1994-2000). She was responsible for two daily current affairs programs, Focus and Oriental Horizon.

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Shaping Taiwan's Politics: Democracy, Identity & Security 20 Years After the Lift of Martial Law

Presented by: The Sigur Center for Asian Studies and The Future of Democracy Initiative

Thursday, September 27, 2007
9:15 a.m. - 2:00 pm
State Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

Agenda:
9:15 am -- Welcome & Introduction

  • Kirk Larsen, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies & Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, The George Washington University

9:30 a.m. - 10:00 am -- Keynote Address

  • Representative Jaushieh Joseph Wu, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office, Washington, DC

10:00 a.m. - 11:45 am -- Panel I: Taiwan's Democratic Experience

  • Chair: Edward McCord, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, The George Washington University
  • Steven Phillips, Director of Asian Studies & Associate Professor of History, Towson University, "Historical Contexts for Taiwan's Democratization"
  • Vincent Wang, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, University of Richmond, "Economic Development & Democracy"
  • Richard Bush, Senior Fellow & Director, Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution, "Democratic Reform & Future Prospects"

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 pm -- Luncheon: Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 pm -- Panel II: External Environment & Taiwan's Democracy

  • Chair: Harry Harding, University Professor of International Affairs, The George Washington University
  • Bob Sutter, Adjunct Professor of International Affairs, The George Washington University & Visiting Professor, Georgetown University, "Democracy & Cross-Strait Relations"
  • Kerry Dumbaugh, Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service, "U.S.-Taiwan Relations & Role of Democracy"
  • John Tkacik, Jr., Senior Research Fellow, The Heritage Foundation, "Democratic Taiwan & Asian Democracy"
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Worldviews of Major and Aspiring Powers: Exploring National Identities

Presented by: Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

Friday, September 14, 2007
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Agenda:
9:30 am - 10:00 am -- Welcome

  • Henry Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University; and
  • David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University

10:00 am - 12:00 pm -- Panel I - Major Powers

  • The United States
    Henry Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University
  • The European Union
    Hanns Maull, Chair for Foreign Policy and International Relations, University of Trier
  • Japan
    Richard Samuels, Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm -- Panel II - Major Powers, continued

  • Russia
    Nikolas Gvosdev, Senior Fellow at The Nixon Center and Editor of The National Interest
  • China
    David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm -- Panel III - Aspiring Powers

  • India
    Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director of the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University
  • Association of Southeast Asian Nations
    Evelyn Goh, Lecturer in International Relations, St. Anne's College, Oxford University
  • Iran
    Ali Ansari, Professor of History and Director of the Iranian Institute, University of St. Andrews
  • Brazil
    Riordan Roett, Sarita and Dan Johnston Professor and Director of Western Hemisphere Studies and the Latin American Studies Program, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm -- Concluding Commentary

  • What Does it Mean to be a Power in Today's World?
    Harry Harding, University Professor of International Affairs, The George Washington University
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Summer 2007

Why Do Koreans Have Their History Backwards?

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Thursday, June 28, 2007
4:00-5:30 pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
1957 E Street, NW

Mark Peterson, Head, Korea Section, Brigham Young University

Mark Peterson is currently Head of the Korea Section, Department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages, at Brigham Young University (BYU). He has been the coordinator of the Asian Studies Program and was the director of the undergraduate programs in the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. Prior to arriving at BYU in 1984, he was the director of the Fulbright program in Korea from 1978 to 1983. Dr. Peterson also served as the President of the Korea Pusan Mission from 1987 to 1990. He is a member of the Association for Asian Studies, where he is the chair of the Korean Studies Committee, and the book review editor for the Journal of Asian Studies for Korean Studies books. He is also a member of the Royal Asiatic Society, the International Association for Korean Language Education, the International Korean Literature Association and the American Association of Korean Teachers. Dr. Peterson received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in the field of East Asian Languages and Civilization.

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Competitiveness in the Power Triangle: The Digital Silk Road of the 21st Century

Presented by: Bridging Nations, The Sigur Center and TiE-DC

Monday, June 25, 2007
1800 K Street NW
Conference Room B1
Washington D.C, 20006

Just as the Silk Road once brought together a collection of diverse nations through trade, Bridging Nations hopes to use business, leadership and education as a starting point in improving relations between the U.S., India and China — referred to collectively as the Power Triangle. The conference objective is to bring together leaders in the realms of business, academia and policy from these three countries in order to explore the implications of current events on trilateral relations within the Power Triangle.

Agenda:
9:00-9:05 am Opening Remarks by Dr. Prakash Ambegaonkar, Founder of Bridging Nations

9:05-9:10 am Introduction of Mr. Tommy Thompson by Dr. John Hamre, President of CSIS

9:10-9:30 am Breakfast Keynote Address by Mr. Tommy Thompson, former Secretary of Department of Health and Human Services

9:30-10:45 am Session 1: Strategies for Workforce Development

10:45-11:15 am Coffee Break

11:15 am-12:30 pm Session 2: The Effects of The Free Flow of Human Capital

12:30-1:10 pm Lunch

1:10-1:40 pm Keynote Address by Mr. Sam Pitroda, Chairman of India's Knowledge Commission

1:40-2:00 pm Q & A With Mr. Sam Pitroda

2:00-3:15 pm Session 3: The New Security Architecture forAsia

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Roundtable: Transnational Collaboration & Taiwan's Challenges

Friday, June 22, 2007
12 noon - 2 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Opening Remarks
David W. F. Huang, Deputy Representative, Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO), USA

David W.F. Huang was appointed Deputy Representative, TECRO in June 2007. He has a distinguished diplomatic and academic record. Most recently, he was Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica in Taiwan; and Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of National Development, National Taiwan University. He was also Vice Chairman, Mainland Affairs Council (Cabinet Ministry); and Executive Board Advisor, Center for Election Studies, National Chengchi University. He is the author of numerous scholarly and policy research articles. He holds a D. Phil in Politics from Oxford University.

The Context for Collaboration in Asia & Beyond: A View from Taiwan
Chih Fa (Jeffrey) Wang, The Brookings Institution

Chih Fa (Jeffrey) Wang is currently a Taiwan Diplomacy Fellow at The Brookings Institution's Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies. Previously, he held posts at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Taiwan as the Executive Secretary of the NGO Affairs Committee and the Section Chief of the Department of International Organizations. He was also the Director of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in New York.

U.S. Perspectives on Transnational Collaboration & Taiwan
Cobb Mixter, U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs

Cobb Mixter serves on the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs as the Professional Staff Member responsible for East Asia and Pacific issues. Previously, he was the lead Asia Analyst for Lehman Brothers' Business Intelligence Group in New York and a research associate in the Asia Studies Program of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Cross-Border Health Issues & Taiwan
Bonnie Glaser, Center for Strategic & International Studies

Bonnie Glaser is currently Senior Associate of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic & International Studies. She is a board member of the U.S. Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Ms. Glaser has served as an Asian affairs consultant for the Department of Defense, Department of State and Sandia National Laboratories, as well as other U.S. government agencies. She has written extensively on Chinese threat perceptions and views of the strategic environment, along with related topics.

Discussant:
Fu-Kuo Liu, National Chengchi University, Taiwan

Fu-Kuo Liu is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution's Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies, Foreign Policy Studies, and is also an Associate Research Fellow and Adjunct Associate Professor at National Chengchi University's Institute of International Relations. In addition, he serves as the Executive Director of the National Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP) Taiwan. Previously, Dr. Liu served in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and was a Consultative Advisor for the Mainland Affairs Council. He has taught at the Chinese Culture University and National Chung Shing University.

Schedule:
12:00 - 12:30 pm – Light Buffet Lunch
12:30 - 2:00 pm – Lecture

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Spring 2007

China's Past: Does it Shape the Present?

Presented by: The GW History Department

Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History, Yale University

Professor Jonathan Spence teaches in the field of Chinese history from around 1600 to the present and on Western images of China since the middle ages. He is the author of 15 books on Chinese history and has edited several others. His many honors include the Los Angeles Times History Prize in 1982 and the Vursel Prize of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1983. He was a MacArthur Fellow in 1988 and served as president of the American Historical Association in 2004-2005.

Monday, May 7, 2007
4:00 pm

Place: Third Floor Amphitheater, Cloyd Heck Marvin Student Center, 800 21st St., NW

The Sigur Center, with Generous Support from the POSCO Foundation and Stanford University, Presents:

Conference Title: Korean NGO Activities and Perspectives: Peace, Human Rights and Civic Participation

Thursday, April 26, 2007
Lindner Family Commons, The Elliott School of International Affairs, 6th Floor, 1957 E Street, NW

Agenda:

Continental Breakfast/Registration (8:30 am - 9:00 am)

Introduction (9:00 am - 9:30 am): Welcoming Remarks and Introduction

  • Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, George Washington University
  • Gi-Wook Shin, Director, Shorenstein APARC; Director, Korean Studies, Stanford University
  • Kwang-Woong Choi, Vice President, POSCO

Opening Speech (9:30 am - 10:00 am):

  • Won-Soon Park, Attorney and Executive Secretary, Hope Institute, "The Korean Civic Movement"

Session I (10:00 am - 11:30 am): Peace and Korean NGOs

  • Wooksik Cheong, Representative/Full-time resident, Civil Network for a Peaceful Korea; and POSCO NGO Fellow, George Washington University, "The Two Koreas and the United States: Another Future is Possible"
  • Bogeun Kim, Secretary General, Hankyoreh Foundation for Reunification and Culture; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Columbia University, "A Survey: Knowledge of North Korea Among NGOs in the United States and South Korea"
  • Jaehun Choi, Manager, Imagination for International Solidarity; and POSCO NGO Fellow, British Columbia University, Canada, "The Overseas Dispatch of South Korean Troops: Why Should We Go There?"
  • Discussant: John Feffer, Co-Director, Foreign Policy in Focus and Director of Global Affairs, International Relations Center
  • Moderator: Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, George Washington University

Luncheon (11:30 am - 12:30 pm): 6th Floor Lounge

Keynote Speech (12:30 pm - 1:15 pm)

  • Don Oberdorfer, Chairman, The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS, "New Triangle: Two Koreas and the U.S. in the 21st Century: Prospects and the NGO's Role"

Session II (1:15 pm - 3:15 pm): Human Rights and Korean NGOs

  • Seung Chang Ha, Former General Secretary, Citizens' Action Network; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Columbia University, "Immigration Problems as the Upcoming Agenda in Korea"
  • Mi Sun Kim, Secretary-General, Migrant Workers Health Association in Korea; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Stanford University, "Advocacy Networks for (Im)migrant's Rights in the U.S. (Bay Area) and Korea - Strategies, Gains, and Challenges for the Networks"
  • Sooji Lee, Activist, Research Institute of the Differently-Abled Persons' Right in Korea; and POSCO NGO Fellow, British Columbia University, Canada, "Before and After Institutional Closures: How Should a Community Prepare? From the Experience of Woodlands and Other Institutional Closures in British Columbia, Canada"
  • Yuseok Chung, Director, Counseling & Human Rights Bureau at the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Indiana University, "The Anti-Sexual Violence Movement in Korea : Achievements and Limits of the Feminist Law Reform Movement"
  • Discussant: Laureen Laglagaron, Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute
  • Moderator: Don Baker, Professor and Director of the Centre for Korean Research, University of British Columbia

Coffee Break (3:15 pm - 3:30 pm)

Session III (3:30 pm - 5:00 pm): Civic Participation and Korean NGOs

  • Il Pyo Hong, Researcher, Institute for a Participatory Society; and POSCO NGO Fellow, George Washington University, "How U.S. Think Tanks Influence Policy-making: Comparing Progressive and Conservative Think Tanks"
  • So Yeun Kim, Researcher, Environmental Justice Research Institute; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Indiana University, "Problems of Conflict Resolution and the NGO's Role for Civic Participation in South Korea"
  • Doo-hyon Choi, Chief, Bureau for a Green City, Korea Federation for Environments, Jeonju; and POSCO NGO Fellow, Stanford University, "Social Capital in the U.S. as Compared to South Korea"
  • Discussant:Nigina Bakhrieva, Reagan Fascell Democracy Fellow, National Endowment for Democracy; and Founder and Director of the Bureau on Human Rights and Rule of Law
  • Moderator: Kirk Larsen, Korea Foundation Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, George Washington University
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Challenges for U.S.-Japan Relations: Koizumi's Legacy & Abe's Security Policies

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Speaker: Ellis Krauss, Professor of Japanese Politics and Policymaking, UC San Diego

Ellis Krauss, a leading expert on Japanese politics, U.S.-Japan relations and Japan's political economy, is Professor of Japanese Politics and Policymaking at University of California, San Diego. He is currently working on a project with a British and German scholar on U.S.-Japan relations in comparison to U.S.-British and U.S.-German relations in political economy, security and global governance issues. Professor Krauss has written or edited many books and articles in professional journals, including recent pieces in the British Journal of Political Science and American Political Science Review. He co-edited a book with T.J. Pempel, Beyond Bilateralism: U.S.-Japan Relations in the New Asia Pacific (Stanford University Press, 2004), and wrote Broadcasting Politics in Japan: NHK and Television News (Cornell University Press, 2000), about NHK, Japan's mammoth public broadcaster. Professor Krauss earned his MA and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Date:Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 12:30-1:45 pm

Place: Lindner Family Commons, The Elliott School of International Affairs, 6th Floor, 1957 E Street, NW

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Title: From Asia to America: Uncovering the Forgotten History of GW's Early Connections to Asia

Presented by: the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

GW's first Asian students date from the 1890s, and in the following 40 years, at least 100 Chinese, Koreans, Japanese and Filipinos attended the university. Some of them — like Philip Jaisohn, Jose Abad Santos, Kenkichi Kodera and Ayako Ishigaki — were pioneers. This lecture will discuss this largely unknown story and introduce the audience to GW's surprising place in Asian American history.

Speaker: Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Shawn McHale is currently Associate Professor of History and International Affairs and Director of the Sigur Center for Asian Studies at George Washington University. Born in Southeast Asia, McHale received his B.A. with honors from Swarthmore College, an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of Hawaii and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Southeast Asian history from Cornell University. He has taught courses in East and Southeast Asian history, Vietnam and on colonialism and its legacy. His current research interests include decolonization, the First Indochina War and religion and Third Worldism. Professor McHale's publications include "Vietnamese Marxism, Dissent, and the Politics of Postcolonial Memory: Tran Duc Thao, 1946-1993," in the Journal of Asian Studies (February 2002); Print and Power: Confucianism, Communism, and Buddhism in the Making of Modern Vietnam (University of Hawaii Press, 2004); and "Freedom, Violence, and the Struggle Over the Public Realm in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, 1945-1958," in Naissance d'un Etat-Parti: le Viet Nam depuis 1945, Benoit de Treglode and Christopher Goscha, eds. (Paris: Les Indes Savantes, 2004).

Wednesday, April 18, 2007, 12:30-1:45 pm

Place: The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Suite 503, 1957 E Street, NW

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Panel Title: Making Democracy Stick: Lessons from Mature, Emerging and Transitional Democracies in Asia

Presented by: the Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Elliott School's Future of Democracy Initiative

Speakers:

"Voice & Loyalty: Mobilizing Political Stability in the World's Largest Democracy"
Emmanuel Teitelbaum, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

"Democratization in South Korea: Prospects and Challenges"
Kirk Larsen, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs

"Prospects for a Democratic Afghanistan"
Marvin Weinbaum, Visiting Professor, The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, and Scholar in Residence, The Middle East Institute

Discussant: Alasdair Bowie, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Wednesday, April 11, 200712:30-2:00 pm

Place: Lindner Family Commons, The Elliott School of International Affairs, 6th Floor, 1957 E Street, NW

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Title: Comparing India & China: Market-Friendly Federalism and Democracy Links

In the Elliott School's Future of Democracy Initiative and the Sigur Center's New India Initiative

Speaker: Aseema Sinha, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Discussant: Jiawen Yang, Professor of International Business and International Affairs, George Washington University

Aseema Sinha is Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she teaches comparative politics. Her book, The Regional Roots of Developmental Politics in India: A Divided Leviathan (Indiana University Press, 2005), received the Joseph Elder Award for the Best Book in the Indian Social Sciences. Her research focuses on the linkages between politics and economics, business-government relations, comparative federalism and globalization, with a focus on international sources of change in developing countries. She is also interested in India-China comparisons, including federalism and how it influences economic reform trajectories in both countries. Professor Sinha was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 2004-05. She received her Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Thursday, April 5, 2007

Time: 12:00 - 12:30 pm Light Buffet Lunch; 12:30 - 2:00 pm Lecture

Place: City View Room, 7th Floor, 1957 E Street, NW

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Title: Indonesian News Post-Soeharto: Changing Ideals & Professional Practices

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Speaker: Janet Steele, Associate Professor, George Washington University

Janet Steele is currently Associate Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. Her research focuses on how culture is communicated through the mass media. She is a frequent visitor to Indonesia, where she lectures on topics ranging from the role of the press in a democratic society to specialized courses on narrative journalism. Her book, Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto's Indonesia (Equinox Publishing, 2005), focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship to the politics and culture of New Order Indonesia. She has published articles on media history and criticism in journals such as Indonesia, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Political Communication, Columbia Journalism Review and The American Journalism Review. A former Fulbright professor in the American Studies program at the University of Indonesia (1997-98), she was awarded a second Fulbright teaching and research grant to Jakarta's Dr. Soetomo Press Institute for 2005-06. Professor Steele received her MA and Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University.

Date:Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 12:30-1:45 pm

Place: The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Suite 503, 1957 E Street, NW

The Sigur Center's Taiwan Education and Research Program Presents:

Title: PLA Modernization & Taiwan's Security

In the Taiwan Forum Seminar Series

Speaker: Richard Fisher, Jr., Vice President, International Assessment and Strategy Center

Richard Fisher is IASC Vice President and Director of the International Assessment and Strategy Center's Project on Asian Security and Democracy. He is a recognized authority on the PRC military and the Asian military balance and their implications for Asia and the U.S. Fisher has worked on Asian security matters for over 20 years in a range of critical positions: as Asian Studies Director at the Heritage Foundation; Senior Analyst for Chairman Chris Cox's Policy Committee in support of the report of the Select Committee for U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the PRC; and Consultant on PLA issues for the Congressionally chartered U.S.-China Security and Economic Review Commission. Fisher was also Editor of the Jamestown Foundation's China Brief and has been a regular contributor to publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Far Eastern Economic Review, Jane's Intelligence Review, National Interest, Air Forces Monthly and World Airpower Journal. He has served as an election observer in Cambodia, the Philippines, South Korea and Taiwan and performed field research in China, Taiwan, Russia, India and Pakistan. Fisher studied at Georgetown University and Eisenhower College, where he received his BA with honors.

Date: Friday, March 30, 2007, 2:00-4:00 pm

Place: The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Suite 503, 1957 E Street, NW

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China's Muslim Minority: Xinjiang Province in Historical Perspective

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Wednesday, March 28, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

James A. Millward, Associate Professor of Intersocietal History, Georgetown University

James A. Millward is Associate Professor of Intersocietal History at the Edmund Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, where he teaches Asian and world history. His research focuses on the modern history of Chinese frontiers with Inner and Central Asia, including Mongolia, Tibet and especially Xinjiang. He also researches global and silk road musical exchanges. Professor Millward has lived and traveled extensively in China and throughout the Xinjiang region. His publications include Beyond the Pass: Economy, Ethnicity and Empire in Qing Central Asia, 1759-1864 (Stanford, 1998), and most recently, Eurasian Crossroads: A History of Xinjiang (Columbia, 2007). He was an Asian Policy Studies Fellow at the Sigur Center in 2001. Professor Millward has a BA from Harvard, an MA from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London and a Ph.D. from Stanford.

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The 11th Annual Gaston Sigur Memorial Lecture
The Korea Triangle: The Two Koreas between China and the United States

Wednesday, March 28, 2007
Reception – 5:00-5:30 pm
Lecture – 5:30-7:00 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Han Sung-Joo, Former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea

Han Sung-Joo is President of the Seoul Forum for International Affairs and Professor Emeritus, Korea University. He was the Minister of Foreign Affairs (1993-94), the UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Cyprus (1996-97), a member of the UN Inquiry Commission on the 1994 Rwanda Genocide (1999), Chairman of the East Asia Vision Group (2000-01), and Ambassador of the Republic of Korea to the United States (2003-05). He also served as the Director of Ilmin International Relations Institute at Korea University (1995-2002). Professor Han is a graduate of Seoul National University and received a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, he taught at the City University of New York (1970-78) and was a visiting professor at Columbia University (1986-87) and Stanford University (1992, 1995). He was also a distinguished fellow at the Rockefeller Brothers Fund (1986-87). English publications include Korean Diplomacy in an Era of Globalization (1995), Korea in a Changing World (1995), and Changing Values in Asia (1999). He has many publications in Korean, including Nam gwa Puk, kurigo Sekye (The Two Koreas and the World) (2000).

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Toward a Harmonious World: New Developments in China's Foreign Policy

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Monday, March 5, 2007
12:30-1:45 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Qin Yaqing

Dr. Qin Yaqing is Executive Vice President and Professor of International Studies at the China Foreign Affairs University (CFAU); Vice-president of the China National Association for International Studies; and Executive Deputy Director and Secretary-general of the East Asian Studies Center at CFAU. As a leading scholar in the field of international relations in China , Dr. Qin has published extensively. He was on the resource team for the UN High Panel for Challenges, Threats, and Changes (2003) and worked as Special Assistant to the Chinese Eminent Person, China-ASEAN Eminent Persons Group (2005). He is on the international advisory board for the policy analysis series of the East-West Center and member of the editorial board of Global Governance. He has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and received training in international economics at the Antwerp University, Belgium.

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The Making of the "Rape of Nanking": History and Memory in Japan, China, and the United States

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Wednesday, February 28, 2007
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Takashi Yoshida, Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace

Takashi Yoshida is Assistant Professor of History at Western Michigan University. He is currently a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the USIP. His research has focused on the Asia-Pacific War (1931-45) and historical memory, and he is the author of The Making of the "Rape of Nanking": History and Memory in Japan, China, and the United States (Oxford U P, 2006). He is working on a project that examines how war/peace museums in China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan have presented the history and memory of the Pacific War. He holds a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University.

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Engaging North Korea in a Post-Test World: Economic Perspectives

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Flashpoints in Asia

Wednesday, February 21, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Bradley Babson, Asian Affairs Consultant

Bradley O. Babson is currently a consultant on Asian affairs with a concentration on North Korea and Northeast Asia economic cooperation. Previously, he worked for the World Bank, covering several countries across Southeast and East Asia. From 1997-2000 he served as Senior Advisor in the office of the Regional Vice President for East Asia and the Pacific, where he began his studies of the North Korean economy. He was appointed the first Resident Representative to Hanoi, Vietnam from 1994-1997. Mr. Babson has recently participated in projects on North Korea sponsored by the Center for Strategic International Studies, U.S. Institute for Peace, National Bureau for Asian Research and the Stanley Foundation. His most recent writing is a Policy Brief on "Economic Perspectives of Future Directions for Engagement with the DPRK in a Post-Test World," published in December 2006. He serves on the Advisory Council of the Korea Economic Institute of America and is a founding member of the National Committee on North Korea. Mr. Babson received his BA degree from Williams College and MPA degree from the Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs at Princeton University.


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The Experience of a World War Two "Comfort Woman": A Dutch Survivor Discusses Her Story

Presented by: Asia Policy Point and the Sigur Center

In the Sigur Center 's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Friday, February 16, 2007, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Jan Ruff O'Herne

Jan Ruff O'Herne was living in the Netherlands East Indies when the Japanese army invaded Java in 1942. Her female family members, along with thousands of other women and children, were interned in Ambarawa Prison camp. Two years later in 1944, when Jan was 21 years old, she was forcibly removed from the camp into a "comfort station" for the Japanese Imperial Army. In 1992, when three Korean comfort women spoke out publicly for the first time, demanding an apology and compensation from Japan , Jan decided the time had come for her to speak out as well. She has spoken widely on her "comfort woman" experiences, and is the author of 50 Years of Silence. In September 2001, the Netherlands Government awarded her the Order van Oranje Nassau in recognition of her work as a spokeswoman about the plight of the "comfort women." She currently lives in Australia.


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Civil Society & Democracy in Vietnam

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia and the Elliott School's Series on the Future of Democracy

Wednesday, February 14, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
1957 E Street, NW

Le Quoc Quan, Fellow, National Endowment for Democracy

Mr. Le Quoc Quan is currently a Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy, where he is examining the role of civil society in countries that have made a successful democratic transition, with a focus on Vietnam. He is the founder of Vietnam Solutions, a firm which provides expertise on local governance, civil society and grassroots democracy development in Vietnam. Mr. Quan has worked as a local governance specialist for projects funded by the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, UNDP and the Swedish International Development Agency. He has been vocal in his support of democracy and has written extensively for the BBC as well as Vietnamese newspapers. He is a lawyer by training.

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Taiwan, Mainland China and the United States: Another Golden Triangle for Business?

Presentec by:The Sigur Center's Taiwan Education and Research Program

In the Taiwan Forum Seminar Series

Friday, February 9, 2007
2:00-4:00 pm
The Maurice East Conference Room, Suite 501
1957 E Street, NW

Paul S. P. Hsu, Professor of Law, National Taiwan University; CEO, PHYCOS International Co., Ltd.

Mr. Hsu is a widely recognized expert in cross-border economic and commercial transactions, with a specialty practice in corporate strategic planning, Asia-Pacific regional economic cooperation, intellectual property rights and financial services. Mr. Hsu received an LL.B. from National Taiwan University and an LL.M. from New York University School of Law. He joined the faculty of the National Taiwan University in 1969 and also held the position of Senior Partner at Lee and Li, one of Taiwan's leading law firms. As CEO of PHYCOS, Mr. Hsu promotes business-government relations that aid in the development of capital market in areas such as mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and restructuring. Mr. Hsu is also President of the Epoch Foundation and Managing Director of the Board of the Asia Foundation in Taiwan, among other advisory and board memberships.

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Twenty Years Under Blue Skies: A Milestone in Mongolian-American Relations

Presented by: Friends of Mongolia, Chinggis Khan Foundation, North American Mongolian Business Council and The Sigur Center

Thursday, February 8, 2007,
6:30-8:30 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Dr. Alicia Campi, Chinggis Khan Foundation

Dave Citron, Foreign Service Officer, U.S. Department of State

Steve Saunders, President, North America-Mongolia Business Council

Odonjil Banzragch, Senior Foreign Service Officer, Mongolia Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Ambassador Alphonse F. La Porta, Former U.S. Ambassador to Mongolia

Friends of Mongolia, in cooperation with the Chinggis Khan Foundation and The George Washington University's Sigur Center for Asian Studies, is proud to commemorate the 20th anniversary of official U.S.-Mongolian diplomatic relations with a panel discussion on the changing dynamics of this bilateral relationship..

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The New Indian Middle Class?

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Subnational Asia

Wednesday, February 7, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
1957 E Street, NW

Sonalde Desai, Associate Professor, University of Maryland

Sonalde Desai is currently Associate Professor at the University of Maryland's Department of Sociology. Her work deals primarily with social inequalities in the developing countries of South Asia, with an emphasis on gender and class inequalities. Professor Desai has published numerous articles in journals including American Sociological Review, Demography, Population and Development Review and Feminist Studies. She is currently examining changes in the Indian middle classes in the context of India's movement from state capitalism to market capitalism and increasing involvement in the global economy. Professor Desai and Reeve Vanneman, in collaboration with the National Council of Applied Economic Research in New Delhi, recently completed the "India Human Development Survey," a multi-sectoral survey of 40,000 Indian households. Professor Desai received her Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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Election Politics in Bangladesh & the Crisis of Democracy

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Flashpoints in Asia and the Elliott School's Future of Democracy Initiative

Wednesday, January 31, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
The Sigur Center for Asian Studies
1957 E Street, NW

A. Tariq Karim, Former Bangladesh Ambassador to the U.S.

Ahmad Tariq Karim, Ambassador of Bangladesh to the United States from 2001-2002, is currently a Fellow at the Harrison Program on the Future Global Agenda at the University of Maryland. Previously, he was Senior Advisor at the University of Maryland at College Park's IRIS Center from 2002-2005. His primary research interests include state fragility, civil society and democratic transition, political Islam and globalization issues. He is in the final stages of pursuing a Ph.D. in Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. Ambassador Karim held numerous key assignments within Bangladesh's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and in Bangladeshi missions abroad, including as High Commissioner to South Africa, Ambassador to Iran (with concurrent accreditation to Lebanon), Deputy Chief of Mission in Beijing and Deputy High Commissioner in New Delhi. As Additional Foreign Secretary of Bangladesh with responsibility for the South Asian region (1995-97), he played a seminal role in formulating and implementing the strategy for normalization of relations with India. His most recent publication is a special report, "Bangladesh at the Crossroads."

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Espionage at Guantanamo?

Presented by: The Muslim Students Association, College Democrats, Asian Student Alliance and The Sigur Center

Wednesday, January 31, 2007
7:00 pm
Third Floor Grand Ballroom
The Marvin Center, 800 21st Street, NW

Fr. Chaplain James Yee

After being officially recognized twice for outstanding performance as a Guantanamo chaplain, Chaplain Yee was arrested and imprisoned in a Naval brig for 76 days while being falsely accused of spying and espionage. Chaplain Yee's gripping account of his Guantanamo experience has been published and is entitled "For God and His Country: Faith and Patriotism Under Fire."

Questions? Please contact msa@gwu.edu.

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China's Global Activism: Strategy, Drivers, and Tools

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Wednesday, January 24, 2007
4:00-5:15 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Phillip Saunders, Senior Research Fellow at National Defense University 's Institute for National Strategic Studies

Dr. Phillip C. Saunders is a Senior Research Fellow at the National Defense University's Institute for National Strategic Studies. He previously worked at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, where he served as Director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program from 1999-2003 and taught courses on Chinese politics, Chinese foreign policy, and East Asian security. Dr. Saunders has conducted research and consulted on East Asian security issues for Princeton University, the Council on Foreign Relations, RAND, and the United States Air Force. He has published numerous articles on China and Asian security; his most recent publications are the monograph China's Global Activism: Strategy, Drivers, and Tools (National Defense University Press) and "Visions of Order: Japan and China in U.S. Strategy." Dr. Saunders attended Harvard College and received his MPA and Ph.D. in International Relations from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

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The Yomiuri Project on War Responsibility in Japan

In the Sigur Center's Lecture Series on Transnational Asia

Monday, January 22, 2007
12:30-1:45 pm
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Takahiko Tennichi, Editorial Writer, Yomiuri Shimbun

The Yomiuri Shimbun, the largest daily paper in Japan, with a right of center editorial position, has recently completed a year-long project to clarify Japanese leaders' responsibility for the Pacific War. Such an undertaking is very rare in Japan. Why did the Yomiuri start this campaign? How was it accepted by the Japanese? To what extent was its conclusion different from the judgments of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East?

Mr. Tennichi is one of the senior members of the Yomiuri Shimbun War Responsibility Reexamination Committee. He has been at the Yomiuri Shimbun since 1981 as staff writer, deputy editor and now editorial writer. He was also a part-time lecturer at Gakushuin University in Tokyo from 2004 to 2005. Before that, he contributed to the publication, Challenges for China-Japan-U.S. Cooperation (edited by Kokubun Ryosei, Japan Center for International Exchange, Tokyo, New York, 1998). He received his M.A. from The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at The Johns Hopkins University and his Bachelor of Laws from the Faculty of Law of The University of Tokyo.

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Conference: Globalization, Migration, and the State: East Asia's Evolving Landscape of Labor

Presented by: The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and The Sigur Center with generous funding from the Luce Foundation

Thursday, January 18, 2007
9:00 am - 2:00 pm
5th Floor Conference Room
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Tel: 202-691-4020

Schedule:

9:00-9:15 am - Introductory Remarks

  • Robert Hathaway, Director, Woodrow Wilson Center
  • Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies

9:15-10:20 am - Panel I: Framing the Issues: Globalization, Migration, and Labor

  • Moderator: Robert Hathaway, Director, Woodrow Wilson Center
  • Marie Price, Professor of Geography and International Affairs, Department of Geography, George Washington University, "Urban Immigrant Gateways in a Globalizing World"
  • Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, George Washington University, "The Southeast Asian Diaspora: Histories and Relevance to East Asia"

10:20-10:40 am - Coffee Break

10:40-11:45 am - Panel II: Migrants, the State, and the Boundaries of Law I: Korea

  • Moderator: Bhumika Muchhala, Program Associate, Asia Program, Woodrow Wilson Center
  • Yeong Kim, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Ohio University, "Illegal Migrant Workers and the South Korean State: State Control Over Labor Migration"
  • Joon Kim, Associate Professor, Sociology Department and the Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University-Fort Collins, "Insurgency and Advocacy: Unauthorized Foreign Workers and Civil Society in South Korea"

11:45 am - 12:45 pm - Lunch

12:45-2:00 pm - Panel III: Migrants, the State, and the Boundaries of Law II: Japan and Taiwan

  • Moderator:
    Michael Kugelman, Program Assistant, Asia Program, Woodrow Wilson Center
  • Rhacel Parrenas, Associate Professor of Asian-American Studies, University of California at Davis, "Gender Moralist Protection Laws and its Aggravation of Trafficking: The Case of Migrant Filipina Hostesses in Tokyo's Nightlife Industry"
  • Pei-Chia Lan, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, National Taiwan University, and Fulbright Scholar, New York University, "Legal Servitude and Free Illegality: Migrant Guest Workers in Taiwan"

Event Summary (Wilson Center website)


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