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Staff and Fellows

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National Security Archive Staff and Fellows

MANAGEMENT

Thomas S. Blanton

Thomas S. Blanton

Thomas S. Blanton is Director of the National Security Archive at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive won U.S. journalism's George Polk Award in April 2000 for "piercing self-serving veils of government secrecy, guiding journalists in search for the truth, and informing us all." The Los Angeles Times (16 January 2001) described the Archive as "the world's largest nongovernmental library of declassified documents." Blanton served as the Archive's first Director of Planning & Research beginning in 1986, became Deputy Director in 1989, and Executive Director in 1992. He filed his first Freedom of Information Act request in 1976 as a weekly newspaper reporter in Minnesota; and among many hundreds subsequently, he filed the FOIA request and subsequent lawsuit (with Public Citizen Litigation Group) that forced the release of Oliver North's Iran-contra diaries in 1990.

His books include White House E-Mail: The Top Secret Computer Messages the Reagan-Bush White House Tried to Destroy (New York: The New Press, 1995, 254 pp. + computer disk), which The New York Times described as "a stream of insights into past American policy, spiced with depictions of White House officials in poses they would never adopt for a formal portrait." He co-authored The Chronology (New York: Warner Books, 1987, 687 pp.) on the Iran-contra affair, and served as a contributing author to three editions of the ACLU's authoritative guide, Litigation Under the Federal Open Government Laws, and to the Brookings Institution study Atomic Audit: The Costs and Consequences of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Since 1940 (Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1998, 680 pp.). His latest book, Masterpieces of History: The Peaceful End of the Cold War in Europe, 1989, co-authored with Svetlana Savranskaya and Vladislav Zubok, won the Arthur S. Link-Warren F. Kuehl Prize for Documentary Editing of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. His articles have appeared in The International Herald-Tribune, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, Slate, the Wilson Quarterly, and many other publications.

A graduate of Harvard University, where he was an editor of the independent university daily newspaper The Harvard Crimson, he won Harvard's 1979 Newcomen Prize in history. He also received the 1996 American Library Association James Madison Award Citation for "defending the public's right to know." He is a founding editorial board member of freedominfo.org, the virtual network of international freedom of information advocates; and serves on the editorial board of H-DIPLO, the diplomatic history electronic bulletin board, among other professional activities.



Malcolm Byrne

Malcolm Byrne

Malcolm Byrne, Deputy Director and Director of Research, has worked at the Archive since 1986, and since 1990 has supervised the research process of identifying and obtaining documentation for the Archive's collections. He currently directs the Openness in Russia and Eastern Europe Project, and the U.S.-Iran Relations Project, both of which promote multinational and multi-archival approaches to the study of recent, controversial historical events. Previously, he served as co-director of the Iran-contra documentation project, and coordinated the Archive's project on U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War.

His latest book is Iran-Contra: Reagan’s Scandal and the Unchecked Abuse of Presidential Power (Kansas, 2014). His other books include The Chronology (Warner Books, 1987), The Iran-Contra Scandal: The Declassified History (The New Press, 1993), The 1956 Hungarian Revolution: A History in Documents (CEU Press, 2002), and the award-winning Mohammad Mosaddeq and the 1953 Coup in Iran (Syracuse, 2004). He is editor of "The National Security Archive Cold War Reader" series through CEU Press and co-editor of the Archive's microfiche publication series through ProQuest. His articles and book reviews have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Columbia Journalism Review, Dissent, the Journal of Cold War Studies, Iranian Studies, Middle East Report, the Cold War International History Project Bulletin, and other publications, and he has appeared frequently on national television and radio broadcasts. He has also lectured on various subjects at a number of universities.

In 2006, he was a History and Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Prior to joining the Archive, he was Assistant Editor for News Systems at The Washington Post, and an editor of Soviet/East European Report. He is a graduate of Tufts University and earned his M.A. in Soviet studies and economics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. In 1977, he taught English language and literature at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.



SENIOR ANALYSTS

Joyce Battle

Joyce Battle



Joyce Battle is Director of Publications and Senior Analyst for the Archive's projects on South Asia and the Middle East.

She received her B.A. from the University of Michigan in Anthropology and Near Eastern Language and Literature, an M.S. in Library Studies from Columbia University, and an M.A. in Near Eastern Regional Studies from Harvard University.

She directed the Archive's project on Iraq and edited the set Iraqgate: Saddam Hussein, U.S. Policy, and the Prelude to the Persian Gulf War, 1980-1994. Currently, she is working on a document collection on U.S. policy toward South Asia and South Asian nuclear issues.



Dr. William Burr

Dr. William Burr



Dr. William Burr, Senior Analyst, directs the Archive's nuclear history documentation project. He edited two of the Archive's document collections: The Berlin Crisis, 1958-1962 and U.S. Nuclear History: Nuclear Arms and Politics in the Missile Age, 1955-1968.

He received his Ph.D. in history from Northern Illinois University, was formerly a visiting assistant professor at Washington College, and has taught at the Catholic University of America, George Mason and American universities. In 1998 The New Press published his critically-acclaimed document reader, The Kissinger Transcripts: The Top-Secret Talks with Beijing & Moscow. His review and articles have appeared in Diplomatic History, the Cold War International History Project Bulletin, International Security and Cold War History, among others. He was a contributor to Stephen I. Schwartz, ed., Atomic Audit: The Costs and Consequences of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Programs Since 1940 (The Brookings Institution, 1998).

During 1996-98 he served on the editorial board of Diplomatic History. He is currently a member of the Council of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR). He previously served as Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Coordinator for the Archive.



Kate Doyle

Kate Doyle



Kate Doyle is a Senior Analyst of U.S. policy in Latin America at the National Security Archive. She directs several major research projects, including the Guatemala Project, which collects declassified U.S. and Guatemalan government documents on the countries' shared history from 1954, and the Evidence Project, connecting the right to truth and access to information with human rights and justice struggles in Latin America.

Since 1992, Doyle has worked with Latin American human rights groups, truth commissions, prosecutors and judges to obtain government files from secret archives that shed light on state violence. She has testified as an expert witness in numerous human rights legal proceedings, including the 2008 trial of former President Alberto Fujimori of Peru for his role in overseeing military death squads; the case before the Spanish National Court on the 1989 assassination of the Jesuit priests in El Salvador; and the 2010 trial of two former policemen in Guatemala for the forced disappearance of labor leader Edgar Fernando García in 1984.

Doyle edited and published two of the National Security Archive's major document collections:Death Squads, Guerrilla War, Covert Operations, and Genocide: Guatemala and the United States, 1954-1999 and El Salvador: War, Peace and Human Rights 1980-1994; together, the collections contain more than 5,000 declassified records for use by scholars, journalists and researchers. She has written dozens of reports, book chapters, articles, and blogs in Spanish-language and U.S. media. Recently her work was featured in the award-winning documentary Granito: How to Nail a Dictator, by Pamela Yates and Paco de Onís, which narrates her role in the collective effort to indict former Guatemalan dictator Efraín Ríos Montt for genocide and crimes against humanity. In 2012, Doyle was awarded the ALBA/Puffin Foundation prize for Human Rights Activism, which she shared with Fredy Peccerelli of the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala.

Doyle has an MA in International Affairs from Columbia University. She lives in New York City with her husband, Tim Weiner, and their two daughters.



Peter Kornbluh

Peter Kornbluh



Peter Kornbluh, Senior Analyst, has worked at the Archive since April 1986. He currently directs the Archive's Cuba and Chile Documentation Projects. He was co-director of the Iran-contra documentation project and director of the Archive's project on U.S. policy toward Nicaragua. From 1990-1999, he taught at Columbia University, as an adjunct assistant professor of international and public affairs.

His most recent book is Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana (UNC Press, 2014). He is the author/editor/co-editor of a number of Archive books: the Archive's first two documents readers: The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962 and The Iran-Contra Scandal: The Declassified History, both published by the New Press, and Bay of Pigs Declassified: The Secret CIA Report on the Invasion of Cuba (The New Press, 1998). On the 30th anniversary of the Chilean military coup in September 2003 he published The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability, which the Los Angeles Times selected as a "best book" of the year. The Pinochet File has been translated into Spanish and published in Barcelona as Pinochet: Los Archivos Secretos. A smaller book on the United States and the overthrow of the government of Salvador Allende has been published in Chile under the title: Los EEUU y el Derrocamiento de Allende.

His articles have been published in Foreign Policy, The New York Review of Books, the New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and many other journals and newspapers. He has appeared on national television and radio broadcasts, among them "60 Minutes," "The Charlie Rose show," "Nightline," CNN, All Things Considered, and "FreshAir" with Terri Gross. He has also worked on, and appeared in, numerous documentary films, including the Oscar winning "Panama Deception," the History Channel's "Bay of Pigs Declassified," and "The Trials of Henry Kissinger." In November 2003, he served as producing consultant on the Discovery Times documentary, "Kennedy and Castro: The Secret History," which was based on his article in Cigar Aficionado, "Kennedy and Castro: The Secret Quest for Accommodation." He is currently a weekly columnist for the Chilean newspaper, Diario Siete.

ANALYSTS

Michael L. Evans

Michael L. Evans



Michael L. Evans is a senior analyst and director of the Archive's Colombia Project and Mexico Migration Project. Evans is editor of Colombia and the United States: Political Violence, Narcotics, and Human Rights, 1948-2010, a primary source collection of more than 3,000 declassified documents on political violence and U.S. policy in Colombia.

Evans is the author of numerous Archive Electronic Briefing Books on U.S.-Colombia relations, including The Chiquita Papers, a massive collection of the company's own internal memos documenting its illegal payoffs to Colombian guerrilla and paramilitary groups. Evans is a frequent columnist for Semana.com, the online publication of Colombia's leading news magazine, Semana. His work has been cited by The New York Times, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post and virtually every major Colombian periodical.

He has appeared on television and radio broadcasts in the U.S. and Colombia, including National Public Radio, the BBC World Service, Counterspin, and Pacifica Radio's "Democracy Now!" Evans was also featured in "Falsos Positivos," a 2009 documentary on the Colombian Army's extrajudicial execution scandal.

He joined the Archive in 1996 and previously worked as a Research Associate on the Nuclear History, China, U.S. Intelligence, Low-Intensity Conflict, and Guatemala projects.



Carlos Osorio

Carlos Osorio



Carlos Osorio is Information Systems Manager, Analyst and Director of the Southern Cone Documentation Project. In 2002, Carlos published several Electronic Briefing Books on state terrorism and U.S. policy in Argentina and Uruguay. He produced a CD-ROM containing the Department of State's entire Argentina Declassification collection along with annotated selections of documents to judges, lawyers and human rights groups.

Between 2000 and 2002 he served as advisor to the Supreme Court of Paraguay and the Catholic University of Asunción in support of the "Centro de Documentación y Archivo para la Defensa de los Derechos Humanos" (a.k.a. "Archivo del Terror"--"Archive of Terror") of the Memory, Democracy and Human Rights Project. The project catalogued 60,000 documents and microfilmed and digitized some 300,000 documents from the secret police files of Paraguay's former dictator, Alfredo Stroessner. Carlos also worked with the Panama Truth Commission to gather documents on deaths and disappearances in the early 1970's.

Previously, Mr. Osorio worked on the Archive's Guatemala History and Accountability Project, which produced documentary and analytical support to the United Nations Historical Clarification Commission in Guatemala. He coordinated the military research and declassification of U.S. files that were the source of the Archive's Guatemala Military Database, which he designed and constructed himself. He has delivered papers and made presentations at various U.S. and Latin American forums on the use of the U.S. Freedom of Information Act and U.S. declassified documents to clarify human rights abuses and the structure of repressive military apparatuses.

As Information Systems Manager, he supervised the transition of the Archive's computer systems to a Windows network and conducted the migration of the Archive's network to fiber optic. He is currently engaged in the Archive's digitalization process.



SENIOR FELLOWS

Dr. John Prados

Dr. John Prados



John Prados heads the Archive’s Intelligence Documentation and Vietnam Projects, co-directs its Iraq Documentation Project, and is a Senior Fellow on national security affairs, including foreign affairs, intelligence, and military subjects. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science (International Relations) from Columbia University and has authored many books, most recently The Family Jewels: The CIA, Secrecy, and Presidential Power (University of Texas Press); as well as Islands of Destiny: The Solomons Campaign and the Eclipse of the Rising Sun (NAL/Caliber, 2012), and Vietnam: The History of an Unwinnable War (University Press of Kansas), winner of the Henry Adams Prize in American History. Other works include Safe for Democracy: The Secret Wars of the CIA (Ivan R. Dee Publisher, 2006, paperback 2009);Normandy Crucible: The Decisive Battle That Shaped World War II in Europe (NAL/Caliber, 2011), How the Cold War Ended: Debating and Doing History (Potomac, 2010) as well as In Country: Remembering the Vietnam War (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012).

Prados is the author of more than twenty books in all, along with many articles and papers. His research centers on subjects including the National Security Council, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Vietnam war, and analysis of international relations, plus diplomatic and military history more generally. Additional works include William Colby and the CIA: The Secret Wars of a Controversial Spymaster (UPKansas), The Hidden History of the Vietnam War and Presidents’ Secret Wars (Ivan Dee); Inside the Pentagon Papers (with Margaret Pratt Porter, Kansas); and Hoodwinked: The Documents that Reveal How Bush Sold Us a War (New Press, 2004). Among his books, Unwinnable War, Keepers of the Keys (on the National Security Council) and Combined Fleet Decoded (on intelligence in the Pacific in World War II) were each nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Combined Fleet Decoded was the winner of the annual book prize of the New York Military Affairs Symposium, and along with his book Valley of Decision: The Siege of Khe Sanh (with Ray W. Stubbe) was named a Notable Naval Book of the Year by the United States Naval Institute. His The Soviet Estimate was awarded the book prize of the Consortium for the Study of Intelligence. Prados’s papers appear in many other works, and his articles have been inVanity Fair, Scientific American, MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, Naval History, the Journal of American History,Diplomatic History, Intelligence and National Security,Naval Institute Proceedings,The Journal of National Security Law & Policy, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, theJournal of East-West Studies, Survival, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The VVA Veteran. He can be reached at nsarchiv@gwu.edu.

Dr. Jeffrey Richelson

Dr. Jeffrey T. Richelson



Dr. Jeffrey T. Richelsonis a Senior Fellow with the Archive. He has directed Archive documentation projects on the organization and operations of the U.S. intelligence community U.S.-China relations, U.S. military space activities, and Presidential national security directives. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Rochester and has taught at the University of Texas and the American University. He is also the author of a number of electronic briefing books on intelligence and nuclear terrorism.

He is the author of The U.S. Intelligence Community (Boulder: Westview Press, 6th ed., 2011), Defusing Armageddon: Inside NEST, America’s Secret Nuclear Bomb Squad (New York: W.W. Norton, 2009), Spying on the Bomb: American Nuclear Intelligence from Nazi Germany to Iran and North Korea (New York: W.W. Norton, 2006); The Wizards of Langley: Inside the CIA's Directorate of Science and Technology (Boulder: Westview, 2001), America's Space Sentinels: DSP Satellites and National Security (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1999), A Century of Spies: Intelligence in the Twentieth Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995), and America's Secret Eyes in Space: The US KEYHOLE Spy Satellite Program (New York: Harper & Row, 1990). His articles have appeared in Scientific American, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, The International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, International Security, Intelligence and National Security, The Journal of Economic Theory, Public Choice, and other publications.

Dr. Svetlana Savranskaya

Dr. Svetlana Savranskaya



Dr. Svetlana Savranskaya serves as the Archive's director for its cooperative projects with Russian archives and institutes and editor of the Russian and East Bloc Archival Documents Database. She earned her Ph.D. in political science and international affairs in 1998 from Emory University, where she studied under Professor Robert Pastor and worked as a Hewlett Fellow at the Carter Presidential Center in Atlanta. While completing her Ph.D., she served as a research associate and interpreter for several Archive-Cold War International History Project efforts, including most prominently the Carter-Brezhnev Project of Brown University's Watson Institute, as well as the End of the Cold War Project.

A Russian citizen, she has won several fellowships and awards during her graduate studies, including a prestigious dissertation fellowship from the Institute for the Study of World Politics. She did her undergraduate work in history at Moscow State University.



Dr. Robert A. Wampler

Dr. Robert A. Wampler



Dr. Robert A. Wampler, Senior Fellow, has been at the Archive since 1993. He currently directs the Archive's projects on Environmental Diplomacy and Tibet. Prior to these activities, he directed projects on U.S.-Japan and U.S.-Korean relations. These undertakings provided the basis for five document sets: Japan and the United States, 1960-1976;  Japan and the United States, 1977-1990;  Japan and the United States:Part III, 1961-2000The United States and the Two Koreas, 1969-2000, and  The United States and the Two Koreas, 1969-2010 (forthcoming). He organized a series of international conferences for research fellows working with the Japan and Korea projects, whose work provided the basis for two collections of studies edited by Dr. Wampler:  Partnership: the United States and Japan, 1951-2001, co-edited with Akira Iriye (Kodansha International, 2001), and Trilateralism and Beyond: Great Power Politics and the Korean Security Dilemma During the Cold War and After (Kent State University Press, 2012).

Dr. Wampler's work at the Archive has also included biological warfare, nuclear history, NATO military planning and the diplomacy of Henry Kissinger. He was a founding member of the Department of Defense Historical Records Declassification Advisory Panel, created during the Clinton administration to advise the Pentagon on policies regarding the declassification of historically significant records, and he has testified before the Public Interest Declassification Board regarding priorities for U.S. declassification efforts. Prior to coming to the Archive, he taught at the University of Maryland and was Director of the Nuclear History Program's Project on Nuclear Weapons and Alliance Cohesion.  In the latter connection, he organized oral history sessions on the Eisenhower administration and NATO strategy, and helped to develop the Nuclear History Program's primary documents database. Dr. Wampler received his undergraduate training at King College, obtained a Master's in History from Wake Forest University and earned his Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, where he worked with Ernest R. May, in 1991.



RESEARCH FELLOWS

Barbara Elias

Dr. Barbara Elias



Barbara Elias is director of the Afghanistan, Pakistan and Taliban project. An assistant professor at Bowdoin College specializing in international relations and security studies, she received a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.A. with honors from Brown University. In addition to interests in national security, Afghanistan and counterinsurgency warfare, having served as the National Security Archive's FOIA Coordinator from 2003-2006 Barbara also remains interested in issues of government transparency and access to information.



Dr. Brad Simpson

Dr. Brad Simpson



Dr. Brad Simpson is a Research Fellow and director of the Archive's Indonesia and East Timor documentation project. He is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of Connecticut and the author of Economists with Guns: Authoritarian Development and U.S.-Indonesian Relations, 1960-1968 (2008).

Brad earned his Ph.D. in U.S. history from Northwestern University in 2003, where he studied U.S.-Southeast Asian relations during the 1960s. He is currently writing a book on U.S.-Indonesian relations during the 1950s and 1960s, examining U.S. support for an authoritarian regime in Jakarta.

From 1994 to 1995 he worked as a researcher on the Archive's Guatemala History and Accountability Project.



FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT COORDINATOR

Nate Jones

Nate Jones



Nate Jonesis the Freedom of Information Act Coordinator for the Archive. He oversees the thousands of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR) requests and hundreds of FOIA and MDR appeals that the Archive submits each year. He acts as liaison between Archive analysts and government FOIA officers, and serves as the Archive's FOIA counselor to the public. He is also the editor of the Archive's blog  Unredacted and manages its social media.

He authored the Archive's four Archive FOIA Audits, including, Eight Federal Agencies Have FOIA Request a Decade Old, and Freedom of Information Regulations: Still Outdated, Still Undermining Openness.

He earned his MA in Cold War History from The George Washington University, where he wrote his thesis on—and submitted FOIA requests about—the 1983 "Able Archer" nuclear war scare.  He continues to submit FOIA requests for, publish, and analyze documents on the 1983 "War Scare."



INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Maria L. Martinez

Maria L. Martinez



Maria L. Martinez, Database Manager, joined the Archive in June 2002. She received her undergraduate degree in Information Systems from Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL) in Guayaquil, Ecuador. She also earned her MBA at Tecnológico de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico.



LIBRARY AND INDEXING

Lisa Thompson

Lisa Thompson



Lisa Thompson, Director of Production, received her undergraduate degree from Arizona State University, a Master of Science in Library Science from The Catholic University of America, and a Master of Fine Arts in Writing and Poetics from Naropa University.



Autumn Kladder

Autumn Kladder



Autumn Kladder joined the Archive as an Indexer in 2006, bringing with her extensive experience providing authority-controlled metadata for declassified government documents. She received her Bachelor's degree in History from Michigan State University and a Master of Science in Information (specializing in Library and Information Sciences) from the University of Michigan School of Information. Her previous experience includes library and electronic information service positions at Michigan, Michigan State, and LexisNexis.



Stacey Chambers

Vickie Jacobs



Vickie Jacobs joined the Archive as an Indexer in 2013. She received her Bachelor's degree in International Studies (focusing on business communication) and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). Her previous experience includes specialized reference service as well as cataloging and acquisitions work for the Slavic collection at UIUC. Her language skills include Spanish, Russian, Italian and Turkish.



ADMINISTRATOR

Sue Bechtel

Sue Bechtel



Sue Bechtel, Administrator, manages the Archive's office and support systems and staffs the Archive's fundraising, marketing and outreach operations. Previously, she worked as the Program Assistant of the Nuclear History Program at the University of Maryland. She did her undergraduate work at Ohio's Wittenberg University and is currently completing a masters' degree in political science at the University of Maryland.



PUBLIC SERVICE COORDINATOR/RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Curry

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Curry



Dr. Mary Elizabeth Curry, Public Service Coordinator and Research Associate, assists researchers, students and scholars who come from around the world to use the Archive's collections. She responds to email and telephone inquiries and works closely with analysts and other staff to make the Archive's collections available to the public. Her specialty is U.S. business history and biography; she appeared as J.C. Penney's biographer in the December 1997 A&E Biography TV program "J.C. Penney: Main Street Millionaire." Her book Creating An American Institution: The Merchandising Genius of J.C. Penney, was published by Garland, Inc. in 1993 and in paperback in 1997. She is the author of 19 articles on business and biographical subjects published in The Encyclopedia of New York City (1995), The Encyclopedia of World Biography (1985-1990) and The American National Biography (1999). Before joining the Archive Dr. Curry worked as a private investigator in New York City and Washington, D.C. She received a B.A. in History from Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY; and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in History from The American University, Washington, D.C.



RESEARCH ASSOCIATES AND ASSISTANTS

Emily Willard

Emily Willard



Emily Willard is the Research Associate and Project Coordinator for the Genocide Prevention Project, a partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She is currently researching the international response to the conflicts in Rwanda and Bosnia. Emily frequently writes for the Archive's blog, Unredacted, and contributes to web postings. Previously, she worked on the National Security Archive's Evidence Project conducting research on Guatemala, Mexico, and El Salvador, and the Colombia Documentation Project. Emily contributed to the publication of the document collections, Colombia and the United States: Political Violence, Narcotics, and Human Rights, 1948-2010, and Mexico-United States Counternarcotics Policy, 1969-2013. She earned her B.A. and M.A. in International Affairs from The American University in Washington, D.C. focusing her research on human rights and violence against women in Guatemala. Emily is a 2014 Rotary Peace Fellow. She lives in Annapolis, Maryland



Anna Melyakova

Anna Melyakova



Anna Melyakova joined the National Security Archive as a Research Associate in June, 2010, having begun her association with the Archive as an intern. She currently works with Svetlana Savranskaya on Russia-related projects. She served as Editorial Assistant on the award-winning Masterpieces of History: The Peaceful End of the Cold War in Europe, (CEU Press, 2010). In addition, she has co-edited or contributed to several National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Books, and has translated hundreds of Russian-language documents that have appeared in Archive books and Web postings. Her current project is translating and preparing the complete diary of Gorbachev's senior adviser Anatoly S. Chernyaev for publication. Anna has an M.A. in Area Studies from Georgetown University's Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies, and a B.A. in Comparative Literature.



Lauren Harper

Lauren Harper



Lauren Harper is a Research Assistant focusing on FOIA advocacy and open government, as well as on U.S.-Iraq relations. Lauren has been with the Archive since 2011. She co-authored the Archive's 2012 FOIA audit, Outdated Agency Regs Undermine Freedom of Information, and has co-edited or contributed to several National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Books. She also writes regularly for the blog, Unredacted. In addition, she works with Senior Analyst Joyce Battle on the Archive's document collection on U.S. policy towards Iraq. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Middle Eastern Studies and a Master of Public Policy degree, both from the University of Chicago, and received her Bachelor of Arts from Scripps College



Wendy Valdes

Wendy Valdes



Wendy Valdes is Project Coordinator for the Torture Archive, an electronic database of documents related to the detention and interrogation of detainees during the war on terror. In that role, she coordinates the compilation, creation of metadata, and publication of declassified documentation. Wendy joined the Archive in 2008 as a Research Assistant. Among other activities, she interacts with other organizations studying U.S. government terrorism policy, and contributes to the National Security Archive's series of Electronic Briefing Books. Wendy earned a Masters degree in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs from American University's School of International Service and a B.A. in History and French from Pacific Union College.



FELLOWS

Dr. Hope Harrison

Dr. Hope Harrison



Dr. Hope Harrison is a Research Fellow with the Archive's End of the Cold War Project and Assistant Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University. She obtained her master's and doctorate degrees from Columbia University.  She taught at Brandeis University and Lafayette College. She held research fellowships at the Norwegian Nobel Institute, the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Davis Center at Harvard University, and the Free University of Berlin. She is completing a book on Soviet-East German relations from 1953 to 1961, which relies extensively on her work in archives of the former Soviet Union and East Germany.  Prof. Harrison took leave for the 2000-2001 academic year to work on U.S. policy toward Russia at the National Security Council's Directorate on Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia.



Dr. Christian F. Ostermann

Dr. Christian F. Ostermann



Dr. Christian F. Ostermann is the director of the Cold War International History Project of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a Research Fellow at the National Security Archive. He received his M.A. in modern and medieval history from the University of Cologne (Germany) and is currently completing a Ph.D. dissertation on U.S. policy towards East Germany for the University of Hamburg. He has received scholarships and awards from the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo (1999), the Harry S. Truman Library Institute (1995-1996), the Institute for the Study of World Politics (1995), the German Historical Institutes in London (1994) and Washington (1991-1992), the Gerda-Henkel Foundation for Historical Scholarship in Duesseldorf (1993-1994), the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at the Free University of Berlin (1992-1993), and the Konrad Adenauer Foundation (1974-1991), among others. He has presented scholarly papers at more than a dozen conferences; his article "The United States and the 1953 East German Uprising" (1996) won the 1994-1996 Prize for Best History Article in German Studies. 



Dr. Vladislav Zubok

Dr. Vladislav Zubok



Dr. Vladislav Zubok is Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Head of the Russia International Affairs Programme at LSE IDEAS. He was  previously director of the Archive's Russia-related projects. Dr. Zubok, a Russian citizen, previously held a Visiting Fellowship at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo; he was Visiting Scholar at the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and has taught courses on Soviet politics and international relations at Amherst College, Ohio University, Stanford University, and the University of Michigan. A Ph.D. recipient and former senior research fellow of the Institute for the Study of the USA and Canada (Moscow), Dr. Zubok has written numerous articles on international relations and two of the first six working papers of the Cold War International History Project at the Wilson Center. His book, Inside the Kremlin's Cold War (with Constantin Pleshakov), published in 1996 by the Harvard University Press, won the 1996 Lionel Gelber Prize as the best book of the year in international affairs.



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