Institute for International Economic Policy

Stream of Work to Make Trade Policy More Trusted, Transparent, and Accountable
Background:

Trade policymaking in the US, EU and in many other countries does not fit expectations for good governance in the Internet age. Public engagement in the trade policy process in the U.S. is sporadic and limited. Although the press informs the public of the outlines and objectives of the negotiations, many of the actual negotiating documents remain secret. n this stream of work under Global Economic Governance, led by Professors Michael Owen Moore and Susan Ariel Aaronson, we make suggestions to build trust; promote public involvement; and increase accountability.

Documents:
  1. Susan Ariel Aaronson, Memo on "Strategies to Increase Public Trust and Accountability in US Trade Policymaking"
  2. Susan Ariel Aaronson, Redefining the Terms of Trade Policymaking (book) forwards by Senator Max Baucus and Congressman Amo Houghton, (2011), chapters 5 and 6, pp. 41-59. (PDF)
  3. Professor Moore and Aaronson proposal to the European Union on improvements to trade policymaking 2012 (PDF)
  4. Professor Aaronson presentation to TTIP negotiations, “How is as Important as What” at TTIP stakeholder meeting, George Washington University, May 2013 (PowerPoint)
  5. Article about TTIP stakeholder meetings and what’s at stake: http://gwtoday.gwu.edu/what%E2%80%99s-stake-us-eu-trade-negotiations
  6. Susan Ariel Aaronson, “Argument: Trade Secrets,” Foreign Policy, 6/17/2013, http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/06/17/trade_secrets_eu_us_free_trade_agreement_negotiations
  7. Susan Ariel Aaronson and Michael Owen Moore, “A Trade Policy for the Millennials,” Baltimore Sun 12/13/2013, http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-12-17/news/bs-ed-trade-policy-20131217_1_trade-policy-trade-agreement-trade-liberalization
  8. Professor Aaronson recommendations to the Open Government Partnership on trade policymaking, November 2014, (PDF).
Direct and Indirect Effects:

At the suggestion of Aaronson and others, the US Trade Representative agreed to create a new Public Interest Advisory Committee to weigh the public interest in specific trade agreements. However, as of December 2014 it has not been created. Meanwhile under pressure from governments and the public, the EU agreed to make its TTIP negotiating documents publicly available.1


On the Public Interest Advisory Committee, see http://www.ustr.gov/federal-register-notices/requests-nominations-public-interest-trade-advisory-committee. On EC negotiating positions made public, see Communication to the Commission concerning transparency in TTIP negotiations,” EUROPEAN COMMISSION, 11/25/2014, http://ec.europa.eu/news/2014/docs/c_2014_9052_en.pdf

Please contact iiep@gwu.edu for more information.